2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166237
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Standardized rest periods for preterms
Author(s):
Holditch-Davis, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.edu
Abstract:
Objective: To examine the effects of standardized rest periods on the sleep-wake states of preterm infants who were convalescing. Design: A randomized experimental study conducted from time of infants' entry into intermediate care until their discharge from the hospital. Setting: The intermediate care nursery of a tertiary car hospital. Subjects: Forty-six preterm infants (23 matched pairs). A subset of 12 pairs in which infants in both the experimental and control groups were in the study for 3 weeks were analyzed longitudinally. Interventions; Four standardized rest periods each day. Rest periods were 1 1/2 hours in length and were conducted so that one was on the day shift, one on the evening shift, and tow on the night shift. During the rest periods, the isolette was covered, and infants were left undisturbed except for care necessary to meet urgent needs. Control infants received standard nursing care. Main Outcome Measures: Infants were observed once a week between noon and 8pm. Three sleep-wake states - quiet awake, active, and sleep - were measured as percentages of the naps and total observation. Daily amounts of apnea and weight gain were obtained from the medical record. Results: Within 5 days, experimental infants exhibited more sleep and less active states during nap time. Infants receiving the intervention for 3 weeks had more sleep and less quiet waking states during naps. State patterns over the entire observation did not differ between the groups at 5 days; but by 3 weeks, experimental infants had less quiet waking and longer uninterrupted sleep bouts. Although the experimental infants had more apnea at the start of the study than the control infants, the average daily amount of apnea over the 3 weeks of the study did not differ between the groups. However, the experimental infants showed a significantly more rapid decline in the incidence of apnea, as determined by comparing the slopes of the regression of apnea over age. An analysis of covariance using weight on entry into the study as a covariate, showed that the experimental infants gained significantly more weight per day than the control infants. Conclusions: A simple modification of nursing care had an impact on the sleeping and waking stated of preterm infants.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStandardized rest periods for pretermsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolditch-Davis, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166237-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the effects of standardized rest periods on the sleep-wake states of preterm infants who were convalescing. Design: A randomized experimental study conducted from time of infants' entry into intermediate care until their discharge from the hospital. Setting: The intermediate care nursery of a tertiary car hospital. Subjects: Forty-six preterm infants (23 matched pairs). A subset of 12 pairs in which infants in both the experimental and control groups were in the study for 3 weeks were analyzed longitudinally. Interventions; Four standardized rest periods each day. Rest periods were 1 1/2 hours in length and were conducted so that one was on the day shift, one on the evening shift, and tow on the night shift. During the rest periods, the isolette was covered, and infants were left undisturbed except for care necessary to meet urgent needs. Control infants received standard nursing care. Main Outcome Measures: Infants were observed once a week between noon and 8pm. Three sleep-wake states - quiet awake, active, and sleep - were measured as percentages of the naps and total observation. Daily amounts of apnea and weight gain were obtained from the medical record. Results: Within 5 days, experimental infants exhibited more sleep and less active states during nap time. Infants receiving the intervention for 3 weeks had more sleep and less quiet waking states during naps. State patterns over the entire observation did not differ between the groups at 5 days; but by 3 weeks, experimental infants had less quiet waking and longer uninterrupted sleep bouts. Although the experimental infants had more apnea at the start of the study than the control infants, the average daily amount of apnea over the 3 weeks of the study did not differ between the groups. However, the experimental infants showed a significantly more rapid decline in the incidence of apnea, as determined by comparing the slopes of the regression of apnea over age. An analysis of covariance using weight on entry into the study as a covariate, showed that the experimental infants gained significantly more weight per day than the control infants. Conclusions: A simple modification of nursing care had an impact on the sleeping and waking stated of preterm infants.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:04Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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