2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166238
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Being in Relation to Others: Social Support and Long Term Survivors of AIDS
Author(s):
Barroso, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.edu
Abstract:
One concern to nurses who care for people with HIV disease is how to assist them to best utilize social support available to them. In an illness unparalleled by the stigma suffered by those infected, social support is a crucial dimension in supporting them to find a level of health within the context of their illness. This paper presents data on social support and long term survivors of AIDS. It is part of a larger study on the phenomenon of becoming a long term survivor of AIDS. A naturalistic study design using multiple intensive ethnographic interviews was employed to elicit data from 14 men and 6 women who were long term survivors of AIDS. Theortecial and purposive sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included being at least 18 years old and English speaking; being in Stage IV of HIV disease for at least 3 years; and self-definition as a long term survivor. Data were generated through multiple intensive open-ended interviews, demographic information sheets, and self-reporting of T4 cell counts. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques and the method of constant comparison. One of the dimensions that emerged from the data was one titled "being in relation to others." This was the interpersonal dimension of becoming a long term survivor of AIDS, and was defined as a complex set of interpersonal relationships that had been renegotiated due to the stigma of AIDS and its modes of transmission; many of the participants found themselves rejected by family and friends. Participants realized they had to establish new relationships and renegotiate old relationships in order to survive with AIDS. Specific ways of being in relation to others included dealing with one's family, renegotiating their friendship group, helping others with HIV, and developing a relationship with a higher power. The traditional concept of social support ususally involves the provision of direct assistance or emotional support. The results of this study offer a more complex view of social support which includes the renegotiation of roles, dealing with the stigma of a disease, and reassemmbling the support network. It also addresses the idea of a relationship with a higher power as a form of social support. The results of this study have implications for counseling people with HIV disease, and for nursing actions to enhance social support in this vulnerable group.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeing in Relation to Others: Social Support and Long Term Survivors of AIDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166238-
dc.description.abstractOne concern to nurses who care for people with HIV disease is how to assist them to best utilize social support available to them. In an illness unparalleled by the stigma suffered by those infected, social support is a crucial dimension in supporting them to find a level of health within the context of their illness. This paper presents data on social support and long term survivors of AIDS. It is part of a larger study on the phenomenon of becoming a long term survivor of AIDS. A naturalistic study design using multiple intensive ethnographic interviews was employed to elicit data from 14 men and 6 women who were long term survivors of AIDS. Theortecial and purposive sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included being at least 18 years old and English speaking; being in Stage IV of HIV disease for at least 3 years; and self-definition as a long term survivor. Data were generated through multiple intensive open-ended interviews, demographic information sheets, and self-reporting of T4 cell counts. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques and the method of constant comparison. One of the dimensions that emerged from the data was one titled "being in relation to others." This was the interpersonal dimension of becoming a long term survivor of AIDS, and was defined as a complex set of interpersonal relationships that had been renegotiated due to the stigma of AIDS and its modes of transmission; many of the participants found themselves rejected by family and friends. Participants realized they had to establish new relationships and renegotiate old relationships in order to survive with AIDS. Specific ways of being in relation to others included dealing with one's family, renegotiating their friendship group, helping others with HIV, and developing a relationship with a higher power. The traditional concept of social support ususally involves the provision of direct assistance or emotional support. The results of this study offer a more complex view of social support which includes the renegotiation of roles, dealing with the stigma of a disease, and reassemmbling the support network. It also addresses the idea of a relationship with a higher power as a form of social support. The results of this study have implications for counseling people with HIV disease, and for nursing actions to enhance social support in this vulnerable group.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:05Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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