Metaphors and community-based care of people with HIV infection and significant others

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166241
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Metaphors and community-based care of people with HIV infection and significant others
Author(s):
Powell-Cope, Gail
Author Details:
Gail Powell-Cope, PhD, VISN8 Evidence-based Practice Center, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: gail.powell-cope@va.gov
Abstract:
As care for people with HIV infection becomes increasingly community-based health care providers must pay attention to how people use these services in order to design and implement programs with clients' perspectives in mind. One way to learn about clients' perspectives is to elicit the metaphors (that is, the names people give to things that belong to other things) they use. Understanding these metaphors will help health care providers to design more effective and humane services. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss common metaphors people with HIV and their significant others use to describe community-based HIV health and social services. Participatory research methods were used. The sample consisted of 20 adults with HIV infection, at all phases of teh illness, and the designated significant other. Using an open-ended , semi-structured format, in depth interviews were completed. Participants were asked to describe their experiences in obtaining and retaining community-based HIV services. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Reliability and validity were addressed consistent with qualitative methods. The metaphors people used to describe the community-based health care system provided a means for expressing self identities and for describing their relationships with health care providers. Furthermore, each metaphor represented a distinct type of power relationship with community-based organizations and the people who work in those organizations. Common metaphors used to describe community-based care were a: maze, battle, and game. The maze metaphor was used by people who were novices in using the care system. They perceived services as mysterious and confusing and tended to use services through a trial-and-error method. People who used the battle metaphor were often people in transition from novices to seasoned users of community services. Those engaged in battle were beginning to learn how to be self-advocates, but let anger drive many of their interactions with care systems. They tended to view services and service providers as hostile and were motivated by the will to survive HIV infection. Those who perceived serves as a game were the "wise" because they knew how to makethe system work for themselves and for friends. They effectely used the formal and informal care systems, applied spoken and unspoken rules of the game, and used assertiveness selectively to obtain services. Recognizing these metaphors is important for health care providers because they provide insight into how clients use care systems. Providers can begin, then, to work with people from their frame fo references in order to provide the most appropriate and humane care. Because metaphors inform health care providers how they are perceived by clients, health care providers can use metaphors for self-understanding as a basis for interacting with clients and for designing effective community-based services.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMetaphors and community-based care of people with HIV infection and significant othersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPowell-Cope, Gailen_US
dc.author.detailsGail Powell-Cope, PhD, VISN8 Evidence-based Practice Center, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: gail.powell-cope@va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166241-
dc.description.abstractAs care for people with HIV infection becomes increasingly community-based health care providers must pay attention to how people use these services in order to design and implement programs with clients' perspectives in mind. One way to learn about clients' perspectives is to elicit the metaphors (that is, the names people give to things that belong to other things) they use. Understanding these metaphors will help health care providers to design more effective and humane services. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss common metaphors people with HIV and their significant others use to describe community-based HIV health and social services. Participatory research methods were used. The sample consisted of 20 adults with HIV infection, at all phases of teh illness, and the designated significant other. Using an open-ended , semi-structured format, in depth interviews were completed. Participants were asked to describe their experiences in obtaining and retaining community-based HIV services. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Reliability and validity were addressed consistent with qualitative methods. The metaphors people used to describe the community-based health care system provided a means for expressing self identities and for describing their relationships with health care providers. Furthermore, each metaphor represented a distinct type of power relationship with community-based organizations and the people who work in those organizations. Common metaphors used to describe community-based care were a: maze, battle, and game. The maze metaphor was used by people who were novices in using the care system. They perceived services as mysterious and confusing and tended to use services through a trial-and-error method. People who used the battle metaphor were often people in transition from novices to seasoned users of community services. Those engaged in battle were beginning to learn how to be self-advocates, but let anger drive many of their interactions with care systems. They tended to view services and service providers as hostile and were motivated by the will to survive HIV infection. Those who perceived serves as a game were the "wise" because they knew how to makethe system work for themselves and for friends. They effectely used the formal and informal care systems, applied spoken and unspoken rules of the game, and used assertiveness selectively to obtain services. Recognizing these metaphors is important for health care providers because they provide insight into how clients use care systems. Providers can begin, then, to work with people from their frame fo references in order to provide the most appropriate and humane care. Because metaphors inform health care providers how they are perceived by clients, health care providers can use metaphors for self-understanding as a basis for interacting with clients and for designing effective community-based services.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:09Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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