2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166242
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In-Home and Community Service Use by African-American Elders
Author(s):
Wallace, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Wallace, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee-Knoxville College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: debra-wallace@utk.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine in-home and community service use among African-American elders (65+) in a southeastern state. African-American elders have unique cultural health beliefs and behaviors and are considered a vulnerable group with respect to health and well-being (Healthy People 2000). This vulnerability may be exacerbated by the proposed budget cuts to the Older Americans and Social Security Acts. However, there is little scientific evidence on which to validate past and justify future allocations for federally mandated care provided by the aging network to this group of elders. Cox/s Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used to guide the study. Two research questions were addressed: a) which demographic characteristics, social influences, environmental resources, and previous health care experiences were deterministic of higher service use among African-American elders? and b) which demographic characteristics, social influences, environmental resources, and previous health care experiences were predictors of use of specific services among African-American elders? Records of 931 African-American elderly clients of an Area Agency on Aging in South Carolina provided sample data. Males and rural elders are represented in proportions similar to population statistics; low income elders are overrepresented. Multiple linear regression was used to determine characteristics of elders likely to use higher numbers of services; multiple logistic regression was used to determine elders most likely to use specific services. Arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes were the most frequent health conditions experienced. These conditions are consistent with national causes of death and disability among older persons nationally, as was the rate of co-morbidity. Case management, congregate meal, home delivered meal, outreach, and commodity distribution were the most frequently used services. Age, rural vs. urban residence, number and type of health problem, sensory impairment, and instrumental activities of daily living were predictors of use; gender, marital status, living arrangement, payment source, and activities of daily living were not predictors. Implications for advanced practice, health policy, resource allocation, health care delivery, and case management will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIn-Home and Community Service Use by African-American Eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Wallace, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee-Knoxville College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: debra-wallace@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166242-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine in-home and community service use among African-American elders (65+) in a southeastern state. African-American elders have unique cultural health beliefs and behaviors and are considered a vulnerable group with respect to health and well-being (Healthy People 2000). This vulnerability may be exacerbated by the proposed budget cuts to the Older Americans and Social Security Acts. However, there is little scientific evidence on which to validate past and justify future allocations for federally mandated care provided by the aging network to this group of elders. Cox/s Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used to guide the study. Two research questions were addressed: a) which demographic characteristics, social influences, environmental resources, and previous health care experiences were deterministic of higher service use among African-American elders? and b) which demographic characteristics, social influences, environmental resources, and previous health care experiences were predictors of use of specific services among African-American elders? Records of 931 African-American elderly clients of an Area Agency on Aging in South Carolina provided sample data. Males and rural elders are represented in proportions similar to population statistics; low income elders are overrepresented. Multiple linear regression was used to determine characteristics of elders likely to use higher numbers of services; multiple logistic regression was used to determine elders most likely to use specific services. Arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes were the most frequent health conditions experienced. These conditions are consistent with national causes of death and disability among older persons nationally, as was the rate of co-morbidity. Case management, congregate meal, home delivered meal, outreach, and commodity distribution were the most frequently used services. Age, rural vs. urban residence, number and type of health problem, sensory impairment, and instrumental activities of daily living were predictors of use; gender, marital status, living arrangement, payment source, and activities of daily living were not predictors. Implications for advanced practice, health policy, resource allocation, health care delivery, and case management will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:10Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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