Dimensions of understanding in cross-cultural nurse-client relationships: A qualitative nursing study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166243
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dimensions of understanding in cross-cultural nurse-client relationships: A qualitative nursing study
Author(s):
Osborne, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Osborne, PhD, Mount Royal College Centre for Health Studies, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, email: mosborne@mtroyal.ab.ca
Abstract:
During the last two decades European immigration to Canada has decreased while the number of immigrants from Asia and Latin America has increased (Canadian Task Force, 1988). The potential for cross-cultural misunderstanding is evident given the differences in the explanatory models of mental health and illness between these immigrants and the dominant Canadian culture. Consequently, the health needs for this client population may be unmet and services not utilized. Even though nursing plays a major role in the provision of mental health care where nurse-client encounters are the focus of practice, there has been little published research about the cross-cultural interactional process. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore what constitutes understanding within the cross-cultural nurse-client relationship, in the context of mental health-psychiatric nursing practice. The conceptual orientation was based upon the sensitizing concepts of explanatory model (KIeinman, 1978) and caring (Watson, 1988, Gadow, 1988, Noddings, 1984). A naturalistic, descriptive research design, incorporating intensive, semi-structured, ethnographic interviews and participant observations was used. Nurse-client dyads, from community psychiatric rehabilitation programs participated. Thematic analysis was used to induct dimensions of understanding in cross-cultural nurse-client encounters. The impact of the nurse's and client's explanatory models of mental health and illness on the development of understanding, and factors which facilitated or impeded the development of understanding were generated. Study findings suggested that understanding was comprised of five dimensions. The dimensions clustered into two groups: core dimensions were behaviors which gave entry into and enabled the cultural negotiation of the care process; and secondary dimensions were behaviors essential to supporting the facilitation of the core dimensions. Core dimensions were managing the language barrier and the exploration of explanatory models of mental health and mental illness. Essential, supportive dimensions were commitment to a human to human relationship, connecting in a culturally sensitive way and taking time. Three areas of relevance for nursing were: the multi-dimensional, complexity of the cross-cultural interactional process; a further contribution to nursing's body of knowledge on caring; the usefulness of the explanatory model concept in eliciting the influences of personal/professional knowing and the enviromnent as factors impacting the development of understanding.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDimensions of understanding in cross-cultural nurse-client relationships: A qualitative nursing studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Osborne, PhD, Mount Royal College Centre for Health Studies, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, email: mosborne@mtroyal.ab.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166243-
dc.description.abstractDuring the last two decades European immigration to Canada has decreased while the number of immigrants from Asia and Latin America has increased (Canadian Task Force, 1988). The potential for cross-cultural misunderstanding is evident given the differences in the explanatory models of mental health and illness between these immigrants and the dominant Canadian culture. Consequently, the health needs for this client population may be unmet and services not utilized. Even though nursing plays a major role in the provision of mental health care where nurse-client encounters are the focus of practice, there has been little published research about the cross-cultural interactional process. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore what constitutes understanding within the cross-cultural nurse-client relationship, in the context of mental health-psychiatric nursing practice. The conceptual orientation was based upon the sensitizing concepts of explanatory model (KIeinman, 1978) and caring (Watson, 1988, Gadow, 1988, Noddings, 1984). A naturalistic, descriptive research design, incorporating intensive, semi-structured, ethnographic interviews and participant observations was used. Nurse-client dyads, from community psychiatric rehabilitation programs participated. Thematic analysis was used to induct dimensions of understanding in cross-cultural nurse-client encounters. The impact of the nurse's and client's explanatory models of mental health and illness on the development of understanding, and factors which facilitated or impeded the development of understanding were generated. Study findings suggested that understanding was comprised of five dimensions. The dimensions clustered into two groups: core dimensions were behaviors which gave entry into and enabled the cultural negotiation of the care process; and secondary dimensions were behaviors essential to supporting the facilitation of the core dimensions. Core dimensions were managing the language barrier and the exploration of explanatory models of mental health and mental illness. Essential, supportive dimensions were commitment to a human to human relationship, connecting in a culturally sensitive way and taking time. Three areas of relevance for nursing were: the multi-dimensional, complexity of the cross-cultural interactional process; a further contribution to nursing's body of knowledge on caring; the usefulness of the explanatory model concept in eliciting the influences of personal/professional knowing and the enviromnent as factors impacting the development of understanding.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:11Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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