Illness Experiences and Health-Recovery Behaviors of Patients in SouthernAppalachia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166244
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Experiences and Health-Recovery Behaviors of Patients in SouthernAppalachia
Author(s):
Rosswurm, Mary; Davis, Barbara
Author Details:
Mary Rosswurm, EdD, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Charleston Division, Charleston, West Virginia, USA, email: mrosswur@wvu.edu; Barbara Davis
Abstract:
The impact of culture on health care delivery and health outcomes is often given inadequate consideration, particularly in acute care settings. The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of the influences of Appalachian culture and rural living on patients' illness experiences and health recovery behaviors. An adaptation of Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior served as the organizing framework for this study. Within this framework, patient/health professional interaction was explored by comparing their value systems and their opinions about patient participation in decision-making. Relationships of health outcomes with patient background variables were also examined. The study sample consisted of 257 randomly selected adult patients, who were admitted to medical-surgical units from eight hospitals in West Virginia, a state in the Southern Appalachian Region. The mean age of patients was 57 years. Patients completed interviews in the hospital and phone interviews two weeks after hospital discharge. A subset of 28 native-born Appalachian patients from the sample participated in home interviews. In addition, 203 nurses and 79 physicians completed value rankings and decisional-control questions. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated. The data suggested that illness and health recovery are affected by culture, age, gender, and rural residence. Although there was evidence of cultural change, traditional values and roles persisted in this population and influenced health behaviors. Patients perceived themselves as being able to cope with illness and disability better than preventing illness. They made very few changes to a healthier lifestyle post-hospitalization. Cardiovascular and respiratory problems were comnon health problems. Patients did not wish to be involved in decision-making to the extent nurses would like them to participate. They relied on taking medications for health recovery. Patients identified health and family as their most important values. Health was perceived as being able to carry out everyday activities. The comprehensive picture of the illness experience and health-recovery behaviors described in this study generate ideas for future intervention studies for improving health outcomes for various cultural groups and rural populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Experiences and Health-Recovery Behaviors of Patients in SouthernAppalachiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRosswurm, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Rosswurm, EdD, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Charleston Division, Charleston, West Virginia, USA, email: mrosswur@wvu.edu; Barbara Davisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166244-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of culture on health care delivery and health outcomes is often given inadequate consideration, particularly in acute care settings. The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of the influences of Appalachian culture and rural living on patients' illness experiences and health recovery behaviors. An adaptation of Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior served as the organizing framework for this study. Within this framework, patient/health professional interaction was explored by comparing their value systems and their opinions about patient participation in decision-making. Relationships of health outcomes with patient background variables were also examined. The study sample consisted of 257 randomly selected adult patients, who were admitted to medical-surgical units from eight hospitals in West Virginia, a state in the Southern Appalachian Region. The mean age of patients was 57 years. Patients completed interviews in the hospital and phone interviews two weeks after hospital discharge. A subset of 28 native-born Appalachian patients from the sample participated in home interviews. In addition, 203 nurses and 79 physicians completed value rankings and decisional-control questions. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated. The data suggested that illness and health recovery are affected by culture, age, gender, and rural residence. Although there was evidence of cultural change, traditional values and roles persisted in this population and influenced health behaviors. Patients perceived themselves as being able to cope with illness and disability better than preventing illness. They made very few changes to a healthier lifestyle post-hospitalization. Cardiovascular and respiratory problems were comnon health problems. Patients did not wish to be involved in decision-making to the extent nurses would like them to participate. They relied on taking medications for health recovery. Patients identified health and family as their most important values. Health was perceived as being able to carry out everyday activities. The comprehensive picture of the illness experience and health-recovery behaviors described in this study generate ideas for future intervention studies for improving health outcomes for various cultural groups and rural populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:12Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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