Cardiovascular Reactivity During Cognitive Stress in Women Before and AfterCoronary Artery Bypass Grafts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166246
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Reactivity During Cognitive Stress in Women Before and AfterCoronary Artery Bypass Grafts
Author(s):
McFetridge, Judith
Author Details:
Judith McFetridge, PhD, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: jDurdle@nursing.fsu.edu
Abstract:
Data from recent studies have identified female gender as a risk factor for operative mortality during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and for prolonged hospital stay afterwards. Although there is evidence that cardiovascular reactivity in men with ischemic heart disease (IHD) may be associated with an increase in afterload, data are not available to explain the mechanisms associated with cardiovascular reactivity in women. The purpose of this study was to describe cardiovascular reactivity during cognitive stress in women with IHD before and after myocardial reperfusion. The following hypotheses were tested: (a) heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) will increase significantly from baseline during cognitive stress; (b) stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and myocardial contractility (MC) will not change significantly from baseline during cognitive stress before CABG but will increase significantly from baseline during cognitive stress following CABG; and (c) total peripheral resistance (TPR) will not change significantly from baseline during cognitive stress prior to CABG, but will decrease significantly from baseline during cognitive stress following CABG. The study was quasi-experimental with a test-retest design. The independent variable was cognitive stress and the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) was used to induce cognitive stress. The dependent variable was cardiovascular reactivity and the empirical indicators were HR, SV, CO, MC, SBP, DBP, MAP, and TPR. The Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph (model 304b) and the Marshall 95 sphygmomanometer were used to measure these variables before, during, and after the administration of the SCWT. Forty-two women participated in the study, 21 with IHD and 21 healthy controls. Forty-one subjects were Caucasian, one was African American and the mean age was 66.6 years. Subjects in the IHD group were tested one day prior to CABG and three or five days following CABG, and subjects in the control group were tested on two occasions, one week apart. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis of no change in cardiovascular reactivity during cognitive stress within subject, between subjects, and within-subject-by-between-subjects interaction. The significance level was set at 0.05. The results of the analysis supported the hypotheses. Heart rate, CO and MAP increased significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT before and after CABG (P<0.05). Stroke volume and myocardial contractility did not change significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT before CABG (p>0.05), but increased significantly from resting baseline following CABG (p<0.05). Total peripheral resistance did not change significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT prior to CABG (p>0.05), but decreased significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT following CABG (p<0.05). The findings in the control group were comparable to those documented in the IHD group following CABG. These findings suggest that afterload may increase during cognitive stress in women with IHD prior to myocardial reperfusion. An increase in afterload in the presence of compromised coronary blood flow places the woman with IHD at risk for myocardial ischemia.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiovascular Reactivity During Cognitive Stress in Women Before and AfterCoronary Artery Bypass Graftsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcFetridge, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith McFetridge, PhD, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: jDurdle@nursing.fsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166246-
dc.description.abstractData from recent studies have identified female gender as a risk factor for operative mortality during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and for prolonged hospital stay afterwards. Although there is evidence that cardiovascular reactivity in men with ischemic heart disease (IHD) may be associated with an increase in afterload, data are not available to explain the mechanisms associated with cardiovascular reactivity in women. The purpose of this study was to describe cardiovascular reactivity during cognitive stress in women with IHD before and after myocardial reperfusion. The following hypotheses were tested: (a) heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) will increase significantly from baseline during cognitive stress; (b) stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and myocardial contractility (MC) will not change significantly from baseline during cognitive stress before CABG but will increase significantly from baseline during cognitive stress following CABG; and (c) total peripheral resistance (TPR) will not change significantly from baseline during cognitive stress prior to CABG, but will decrease significantly from baseline during cognitive stress following CABG. The study was quasi-experimental with a test-retest design. The independent variable was cognitive stress and the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) was used to induce cognitive stress. The dependent variable was cardiovascular reactivity and the empirical indicators were HR, SV, CO, MC, SBP, DBP, MAP, and TPR. The Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph (model 304b) and the Marshall 95 sphygmomanometer were used to measure these variables before, during, and after the administration of the SCWT. Forty-two women participated in the study, 21 with IHD and 21 healthy controls. Forty-one subjects were Caucasian, one was African American and the mean age was 66.6 years. Subjects in the IHD group were tested one day prior to CABG and three or five days following CABG, and subjects in the control group were tested on two occasions, one week apart. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis of no change in cardiovascular reactivity during cognitive stress within subject, between subjects, and within-subject-by-between-subjects interaction. The significance level was set at 0.05. The results of the analysis supported the hypotheses. Heart rate, CO and MAP increased significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT before and after CABG (P<0.05). Stroke volume and myocardial contractility did not change significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT before CABG (p>0.05), but increased significantly from resting baseline following CABG (p<0.05). Total peripheral resistance did not change significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT prior to CABG (p>0.05), but decreased significantly from resting baseline during the SCWT following CABG (p<0.05). The findings in the control group were comparable to those documented in the IHD group following CABG. These findings suggest that afterload may increase during cognitive stress in women with IHD prior to myocardial reperfusion. An increase in afterload in the presence of compromised coronary blood flow places the woman with IHD at risk for myocardial ischemia.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:15Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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