2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166247
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms and characteristics of women experiencing a myocardial infarction
Author(s):
McSweeney, Jean
Author Details:
Jean McSweeney, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, email: mcsweeneyjeanc@uams.edu
Abstract:
Purpose of Study: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is now the leading cause of death and disability in women. Associated costs of cardiovascular disease in women are expected to surpass $128 billion in 1995. These costs continue to soar as the life span of women increases. However researchers have traditionally studied CHD and specifically myocardial infarction (MI) as diseases of men and ignored the effect of the disease on women. Little is known about what symptoms women exhibit surrounding a MI and what characteristics women have in common who experience a MI. The purpose of this study was to explore these issues. Research Question: What symptoms are reported by women surrounding their myocardial infarction? Questions related to common characteristics emerged from commonalties identified during initial interviews. Theoretical Orientation and Methods: Kleinman's concept of explanatory models, common sense understandings of an illness expenence, was used to elicit illness narratives surrounding the MI experience. A descriptive and naturistic field study design using indepth interviews was employed purposive nonprobability sampling was utilized to select 20 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse women between the ages of 34-77 who had experienced their first known MI within the previous 6-24 months. Education ranged from less than eight years to masters preparation. Data Generation and Analysis: Data were generated by intensive indepth interviews which followed a semi-structured format and focused on the symptoms women reported prior to being diagnosed with a MI. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, entered into Ethnograph computer program, and analyzed by the techniques of content analysis and constant compartson. Findings and Implications: All women who experienced a MI under the age of 60 were working full time. Ninety-five percent had experienced menopause or had hysterectomies (60%) but only 2 were on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). No subjects had discussed the cardiac benefits of ERT with a health professional. Five were taking vitamins and 4 were taking antioxidants up to one year prior to the MJ. Symptoms reported included severe fatigue up to 1 week prior to MI (75%), pain in the back under the shoulder blades (35%), pain radiating to the right arm (10%), both arms (20%) and localized chest pain (15%). Thirty-five percent reported no to mild pain while 10% reported crushing pain. Chest pain typically occurred as a late symptom. Another common complaint was tingling and/or heaviness in the arms while two women experienced migraine headaches for the first time prior to the MI. Since women experienced atypical symptoms such as mild discomfort, fatigue and back pain, over 50% delayed seeking treatment for 24 hours. Seven reported delayed diagnoses of MI after entering the health care system. Of this group, one was sent home while 3 infarcted 1-3 days later while being treated for stress. More research is needed to document symptoms and characteristics of women who have experienced a MI so that commonly occurring symptoms may be identified and taught to women, nurses, and physicians. This should result in more timely reporting of symptoms, earlier treatment, less disability and thus decreased costs associated with MI in women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms and characteristics of women experiencing a myocardial infarctionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcSweeney, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean McSweeney, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, email: mcsweeneyjeanc@uams.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166247-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of Study: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is now the leading cause of death and disability in women. Associated costs of cardiovascular disease in women are expected to surpass $128 billion in 1995. These costs continue to soar as the life span of women increases. However researchers have traditionally studied CHD and specifically myocardial infarction (MI) as diseases of men and ignored the effect of the disease on women. Little is known about what symptoms women exhibit surrounding a MI and what characteristics women have in common who experience a MI. The purpose of this study was to explore these issues. Research Question: What symptoms are reported by women surrounding their myocardial infarction? Questions related to common characteristics emerged from commonalties identified during initial interviews. Theoretical Orientation and Methods: Kleinman's concept of explanatory models, common sense understandings of an illness expenence, was used to elicit illness narratives surrounding the MI experience. A descriptive and naturistic field study design using indepth interviews was employed purposive nonprobability sampling was utilized to select 20 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse women between the ages of 34-77 who had experienced their first known MI within the previous 6-24 months. Education ranged from less than eight years to masters preparation. Data Generation and Analysis: Data were generated by intensive indepth interviews which followed a semi-structured format and focused on the symptoms women reported prior to being diagnosed with a MI. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, entered into Ethnograph computer program, and analyzed by the techniques of content analysis and constant compartson. Findings and Implications: All women who experienced a MI under the age of 60 were working full time. Ninety-five percent had experienced menopause or had hysterectomies (60%) but only 2 were on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). No subjects had discussed the cardiac benefits of ERT with a health professional. Five were taking vitamins and 4 were taking antioxidants up to one year prior to the MJ. Symptoms reported included severe fatigue up to 1 week prior to MI (75%), pain in the back under the shoulder blades (35%), pain radiating to the right arm (10%), both arms (20%) and localized chest pain (15%). Thirty-five percent reported no to mild pain while 10% reported crushing pain. Chest pain typically occurred as a late symptom. Another common complaint was tingling and/or heaviness in the arms while two women experienced migraine headaches for the first time prior to the MI. Since women experienced atypical symptoms such as mild discomfort, fatigue and back pain, over 50% delayed seeking treatment for 24 hours. Seven reported delayed diagnoses of MI after entering the health care system. Of this group, one was sent home while 3 infarcted 1-3 days later while being treated for stress. More research is needed to document symptoms and characteristics of women who have experienced a MI so that commonly occurring symptoms may be identified and taught to women, nurses, and physicians. This should result in more timely reporting of symptoms, earlier treatment, less disability and thus decreased costs associated with MI in women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:16Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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