A Pressure Sensitive Mattress to Monitor Sleep-Related Respiratory Instability in Older Adults - Development and Testing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pressure Sensitive Mattress to Monitor Sleep-Related Respiratory Instability in Older Adults - Development and Testing
Author(s):
Hsiao, Henry
Author Details:
Henry Hsiao, PhD, University of North Carolina, Biobehavioral Lab, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: hsiao@med.unc.edu
Abstract:
Introduction: Frail and cognitively impaired elders are often unable to tolerate the press of the laboratory environment and the apparatus used to monitor respiratory activity during sleep. Less intrusive methods to monitor sleep, movement, and respiratory activity have been successfully used with infants (Holditch-Davis, 1990; Thoman & Tynan, 1979). Recently, Acebo et al (1991) devised a similar system for evaluating sleep efficiency in adults, but they did not evaluate respiratory activity. The purpose of this project was to develop a safe, portable, non-invasive method to monitor and detect abnormal respiratory patterns during sleep in frail or cognitively impaired elders. In this paper, we report the development of the Non-Invasive Respiratory Monitoring System (NIRMS), its validation and 3 other measures of respiratory activity, and the development of a scoring system for detecting pathologic breathing events using the NIRMS. Methods: Supine measures of spontaneous breathing at rest and during simulated central and obstructive maneuvers were obtained from 10 health adults, age 19-41 years. Simultaneous recordings of respiratory activity using inductance plethsymography (Vitalog HMS 5000, Redwood City CA), mattress pressure (NIRMS), capnography (Ohmeda 4700, Boulder CO), and visual observation (VO) were stored to computer (60s/second) and analyzed using the Codas and the Vitalog HMS-5000 Real-Time Data Acquisition Software. Using VO as the reference, analyses were performed on segments consisting of 20 and 40 respiratory cycles and the number of cycles during a 5 minute period. Discrepancies between the 3 methods and VO were evaluated by Wilcoxin Sign-Rank Tests (p<.05). Segments containing body movement were noted by comparing respiratory waveforms with those obtained by the Vitalog HMS wrist actigraph and VO. Results: Compared to VO, there were no statistically significant difference in either the 20 cycle counts (CAP x=20.1 sd=.31; IP x=19.9 sd=1.10; NIRMS x=19.9 sd=.32), the 40 cycle counts (CASP x=40.0 sd=0.0; IP x=39.5 sd=.71; NIRMS x=39.6 sd=.71), or the number of cycles (sign rank test: CAP=.032; IP=.05; NIRMS=-.02) over the 5 minute period. Using a combination of movement and respiratory measures, we devised a scoring system for the NIRMS to differentiate movement from pathologic respiratory events.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pressure Sensitive Mattress to Monitor Sleep-Related Respiratory Instability in Older Adults - Development and Testingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, Henryen_US
dc.author.detailsHenry Hsiao, PhD, University of North Carolina, Biobehavioral Lab, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: hsiao@med.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166251-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Frail and cognitively impaired elders are often unable to tolerate the press of the laboratory environment and the apparatus used to monitor respiratory activity during sleep. Less intrusive methods to monitor sleep, movement, and respiratory activity have been successfully used with infants (Holditch-Davis, 1990; Thoman & Tynan, 1979). Recently, Acebo et al (1991) devised a similar system for evaluating sleep efficiency in adults, but they did not evaluate respiratory activity. The purpose of this project was to develop a safe, portable, non-invasive method to monitor and detect abnormal respiratory patterns during sleep in frail or cognitively impaired elders. In this paper, we report the development of the Non-Invasive Respiratory Monitoring System (NIRMS), its validation and 3 other measures of respiratory activity, and the development of a scoring system for detecting pathologic breathing events using the NIRMS. Methods: Supine measures of spontaneous breathing at rest and during simulated central and obstructive maneuvers were obtained from 10 health adults, age 19-41 years. Simultaneous recordings of respiratory activity using inductance plethsymography (Vitalog HMS 5000, Redwood City CA), mattress pressure (NIRMS), capnography (Ohmeda 4700, Boulder CO), and visual observation (VO) were stored to computer (60s/second) and analyzed using the Codas and the Vitalog HMS-5000 Real-Time Data Acquisition Software. Using VO as the reference, analyses were performed on segments consisting of 20 and 40 respiratory cycles and the number of cycles during a 5 minute period. Discrepancies between the 3 methods and VO were evaluated by Wilcoxin Sign-Rank Tests (p<.05). Segments containing body movement were noted by comparing respiratory waveforms with those obtained by the Vitalog HMS wrist actigraph and VO. Results: Compared to VO, there were no statistically significant difference in either the 20 cycle counts (CAP x=20.1 sd=.31; IP x=19.9 sd=1.10; NIRMS x=19.9 sd=.32), the 40 cycle counts (CASP x=40.0 sd=0.0; IP x=39.5 sd=.71; NIRMS x=39.6 sd=.71), or the number of cycles (sign rank test: CAP=.032; IP=.05; NIRMS=-.02) over the 5 minute period. Using a combination of movement and respiratory measures, we devised a scoring system for the NIRMS to differentiate movement from pathologic respiratory events. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:20Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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