My Mama's Normal Just Like Anybody Else's Mother: The Parenting Experiences of HIV Positive Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166252
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
My Mama's Normal Just Like Anybody Else's Mother: The Parenting Experiences of HIV Positive Mothers
Author(s):
Willis, Danny
Author Details:
Danny Willis, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, (updated February 2015) email: willisdb@bc.edu
Abstract:
Over 85% of all cases of HIV occur in women of childbearing age, and the majority of HIV infected women have children under 18 years of age. Few studies have examined how the progression of HIV influences mothers' relationships with their children. The purpose of this paper is to portray the parenting issues experienced by HIV positive women. This paper is based on information obtained from audiotaped interviews with seven adult pregnant women with HIV and published personal accounts of 13 HIV positive women. These data are drawn from a larger grounded theory study describing the problems faced by women with HIV and their responses to living with HIV. Women's concerns about their children and their ability to mother comprised a basic social psychological problem related to living with HIV. Women viewed that not only were their family members affected by the women's HIV status, but that their illness created additional work that they had to manage. The major components of this problem include: wanting to be a mother, worrying about transmitting HIV to their children, telling children about the HIV status of family members, protecting children from the stigma of being in a HIV positive family, mothering as the illness progresses, and planning for their children's future. While a number of dilemmas surround the experience of being an HIV positive mother, parenting provides a number of benefits to HIV positive women. Women derive a great deal of satisfaction from mothering, and children remind women that they are living. In addition, children provide emotional support and crucial connections through which women derive further support. Many challenges confront nurses who attempt to work with HIV positive women and their families. Understanding the complex nature of the experiences faced by these families is crucial.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMy Mama's Normal Just Like Anybody Else's Mother: The Parenting Experiences of HIV Positive Mothersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Dannyen_US
dc.author.detailsDanny Willis, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, (updated February 2015) email: willisdb@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166252-
dc.description.abstractOver 85% of all cases of HIV occur in women of childbearing age, and the majority of HIV infected women have children under 18 years of age. Few studies have examined how the progression of HIV influences mothers' relationships with their children. The purpose of this paper is to portray the parenting issues experienced by HIV positive women. This paper is based on information obtained from audiotaped interviews with seven adult pregnant women with HIV and published personal accounts of 13 HIV positive women. These data are drawn from a larger grounded theory study describing the problems faced by women with HIV and their responses to living with HIV. Women's concerns about their children and their ability to mother comprised a basic social psychological problem related to living with HIV. Women viewed that not only were their family members affected by the women's HIV status, but that their illness created additional work that they had to manage. The major components of this problem include: wanting to be a mother, worrying about transmitting HIV to their children, telling children about the HIV status of family members, protecting children from the stigma of being in a HIV positive family, mothering as the illness progresses, and planning for their children's future. While a number of dilemmas surround the experience of being an HIV positive mother, parenting provides a number of benefits to HIV positive women. Women derive a great deal of satisfaction from mothering, and children remind women that they are living. In addition, children provide emotional support and crucial connections through which women derive further support. Many challenges confront nurses who attempt to work with HIV positive women and their families. Understanding the complex nature of the experiences faced by these families is crucial.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:22Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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