2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166257
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Two Methods For Measuring Complexity Of Nursing Care
Author(s):
Layman, Eve
Author Details:
Eve Layman, MA/AM, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Eve.Layman@tamucc.edu
Abstract:
Nurse managers throughout health care organizations frequently use patient classification systems (PCS) to estimate nursing care requirements of individual or patient groups (measured in units of time) to allocate nursing personnel. Total nursing time required to achieve desirable patient outcomes is an indicator of a patient's nursing care intensity. When the total time required to provide care to all patients on a hospital unit is calculated, managers responsible for scheduling nursing staff can generate appropriate staffing configurations that result in the best match between available nurse time and total patient group care requirements. The complexity of a patient's care, a dimension of intensity of nursing care, frequently contributes to total time requirements associated with a patient's care. Complex patient situations occur when a patient's unique constellation of health problems requires adjustments in standard nursing procedures. The purpose of this paper is to describe two methods for measuring complexity of nursing care used in establishing predictive validity of the CLOUT Acuity Assessment System (CAAS). The CAAS is a PCS developed to measure intensity of nursing care at hospitals participating in a multi-site study that did not have a standardized method for estimating each patient's nursing care requirements. In a pilot study, complexity of care was measured using 2 criteria--the number of minutes in a 24 hour period of direct nurse-patient interactions and the frequency of occurrence of complex activities. A moderate Pearson-product moment correlation between actual nursing time spent in a patient's room for a 24 hour period and complexity of care provided during that time (r .70, p<.000) was obtained. A less strong but significant correlation (r.31, p<.000) between the total CAAS score and total minutes of care was also obtained. While the correlations provide evidence that patients rated by nurses using the CAAS as higher intensity care patients received more nursing care time during a 24 hour period, the validity of the CAAS to discriminate patients on care complexity remained questionable. In the current observational study, complexity of a patient care situation will be measured by (1) recording time spent in nurse-patient interactions using a direct care observational method and (2) using an adaptation of Verran & Reid's scale to collect subjective ratings of care complexity as defined by Verran. A regression analysis will be used to explore the relationship between subjective estimates of complexity of care, time, and intensity of care ratings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTwo Methods For Measuring Complexity Of Nursing Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLayman, Eveen_US
dc.author.detailsEve Layman, MA/AM, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Eve.Layman@tamucc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166257-
dc.description.abstractNurse managers throughout health care organizations frequently use patient classification systems (PCS) to estimate nursing care requirements of individual or patient groups (measured in units of time) to allocate nursing personnel. Total nursing time required to achieve desirable patient outcomes is an indicator of a patient's nursing care intensity. When the total time required to provide care to all patients on a hospital unit is calculated, managers responsible for scheduling nursing staff can generate appropriate staffing configurations that result in the best match between available nurse time and total patient group care requirements. The complexity of a patient's care, a dimension of intensity of nursing care, frequently contributes to total time requirements associated with a patient's care. Complex patient situations occur when a patient's unique constellation of health problems requires adjustments in standard nursing procedures. The purpose of this paper is to describe two methods for measuring complexity of nursing care used in establishing predictive validity of the CLOUT Acuity Assessment System (CAAS). The CAAS is a PCS developed to measure intensity of nursing care at hospitals participating in a multi-site study that did not have a standardized method for estimating each patient's nursing care requirements. In a pilot study, complexity of care was measured using 2 criteria--the number of minutes in a 24 hour period of direct nurse-patient interactions and the frequency of occurrence of complex activities. A moderate Pearson-product moment correlation between actual nursing time spent in a patient's room for a 24 hour period and complexity of care provided during that time (r .70, p<.000) was obtained. A less strong but significant correlation (r.31, p<.000) between the total CAAS score and total minutes of care was also obtained. While the correlations provide evidence that patients rated by nurses using the CAAS as higher intensity care patients received more nursing care time during a 24 hour period, the validity of the CAAS to discriminate patients on care complexity remained questionable. In the current observational study, complexity of a patient care situation will be measured by (1) recording time spent in nurse-patient interactions using a direct care observational method and (2) using an adaptation of Verran & Reid's scale to collect subjective ratings of care complexity as defined by Verran. A regression analysis will be used to explore the relationship between subjective estimates of complexity of care, time, and intensity of care ratings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:27Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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