2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166258
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Evaluation Of Low-literacy Chemotherapy Literature
Author(s):
Sullivan, Joan
Author Details:
Joan Sullivan, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Administrator and Improvement Research, Medical Center of Louisiana Charity Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: js08@gnofn.org
Abstract:
This is a patient participatory evaluation of two currently available low literacy booklets about cancer chemotherapy. The approach to this evaluative research was based upon culturally directed adult learning concepts. Adult learners choose to learn what is important to them in a way that is meaningful and comfortable to them. For adults entering the cancer chemotherapy experience, information about their treatment, side effects, and side effect management is frequently given in a single discussion at the same time that chemotherapy begins. Patients and their families are often unable to listen attentively in these circumstances. Health care providers understand that learning is difficult in this setting and frequently provide supplemental written information. Recent studies indicate that many brochures are written at the 12th grade reading level or higher. In our population, 55% of patients attending oncology clinics in a large public hospital read at or below the 7th grade level, and these finding are not markedly different from other studies of patients' abilities to read. This finding reinforced the need to determine if the newer chemotherapy booklets written for 7th - 8th grade reading level, "Helping Yourself during Chemotherapy" (NIH #94-3710) and "Chemotherapy: What it is, How It Helps" (American Cancer Society 90-100M-4512) would be seen as useful to our patient population. A qualitative, focus-group approach was used to field-test the two low-literacy brochures. This method allows for continuing review of the data and provides a mechanism to correct false or extreme views. Patients who attended any of three out-patient oncology clinics in an urban, tertiary hospital, were over age 18, English speaking, and just beginning chemotherapy treatments (no more than two cycles) were asked to participate. Four groups were formed to evaluate the brochures. After patients agreed to participate, convenient times were established and patients were invited to come. A series of semi-structured questions were asked and responses were probed when appropriate. The discussions were audio-taped and transcribed. Transcripts and the experiences were analyzed by the researchers individually and together to identify strengths and weakness of the brochures as well as suggestions for improvement. Patients, regardless of educational background, felt that the low-literacy booklets offered meaningful information. Patients reviewed the brochures by comparing the written information to their own experiences of learning that they had cancer, of beginning chemotherapy treatment, and of dealing with both the diagnosis and the treatment. Patients had suggestions for improving the brochures. Patients of all backgrounds appreciated receiving simply written information during the period immediately post-diagnosis and beginning of treatment. A field-test/focus group method can identify regional differences in patient instructions; these may need to be addressed when giving ACS, NCI, or other similar materials. This approach may be useful for other patient populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Evaluation Of Low-literacy Chemotherapy Literatureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Sullivan, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Administrator and Improvement Research, Medical Center of Louisiana Charity Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: js08@gnofn.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166258-
dc.description.abstractThis is a patient participatory evaluation of two currently available low literacy booklets about cancer chemotherapy. The approach to this evaluative research was based upon culturally directed adult learning concepts. Adult learners choose to learn what is important to them in a way that is meaningful and comfortable to them. For adults entering the cancer chemotherapy experience, information about their treatment, side effects, and side effect management is frequently given in a single discussion at the same time that chemotherapy begins. Patients and their families are often unable to listen attentively in these circumstances. Health care providers understand that learning is difficult in this setting and frequently provide supplemental written information. Recent studies indicate that many brochures are written at the 12th grade reading level or higher. In our population, 55% of patients attending oncology clinics in a large public hospital read at or below the 7th grade level, and these finding are not markedly different from other studies of patients' abilities to read. This finding reinforced the need to determine if the newer chemotherapy booklets written for 7th - 8th grade reading level, "Helping Yourself during Chemotherapy" (NIH #94-3710) and "Chemotherapy: What it is, How It Helps" (American Cancer Society 90-100M-4512) would be seen as useful to our patient population. A qualitative, focus-group approach was used to field-test the two low-literacy brochures. This method allows for continuing review of the data and provides a mechanism to correct false or extreme views. Patients who attended any of three out-patient oncology clinics in an urban, tertiary hospital, were over age 18, English speaking, and just beginning chemotherapy treatments (no more than two cycles) were asked to participate. Four groups were formed to evaluate the brochures. After patients agreed to participate, convenient times were established and patients were invited to come. A series of semi-structured questions were asked and responses were probed when appropriate. The discussions were audio-taped and transcribed. Transcripts and the experiences were analyzed by the researchers individually and together to identify strengths and weakness of the brochures as well as suggestions for improvement. Patients, regardless of educational background, felt that the low-literacy booklets offered meaningful information. Patients reviewed the brochures by comparing the written information to their own experiences of learning that they had cancer, of beginning chemotherapy treatment, and of dealing with both the diagnosis and the treatment. Patients had suggestions for improving the brochures. Patients of all backgrounds appreciated receiving simply written information during the period immediately post-diagnosis and beginning of treatment. A field-test/focus group method can identify regional differences in patient instructions; these may need to be addressed when giving ACS, NCI, or other similar materials. This approach may be useful for other patient populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:29Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.