2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166259
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting quality outcomes with a social system theory of nursing empathy
Author(s):
Alligood, Martha Raile
Author Details:
Martha Alligood, PhD, Professor, University of Tennessee, College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: malligoo@utk.edu
Abstract:
Given the quality crisis in acute care settings reported in recent research, new systematic approaches designed to produce positive health outcomes are warranted. The purpose of this study was to discover a theory of empathy from the interpretation of nursing science text, King's Interacting Systems and Empathy. A published review of that text noted an implicit theory of empathy in that work. This study was designed to explicate a social system theory of nursing empathy from the text. Two other theories, personal system and interpersonal system, have been discovered. This paper presents the social system theory with an emphasis on predictable quality outcomes for acute care improvements. The research question was: What explicit theory of empathy can be discovered from the examination of the conceptualization of empathy in King's social system? The rationale for the study was to address the need for a theory of nursing empathy since reviews of the literature have repeatedly identified the need for theories of empathy that are specific to nursing. The method utilized was a qualitative design of hermeneutic interpretation of published nursing science text. This approach was used by a research team who carried out the following process: 1) production of meaning through reading, 2) interpretation of the part being examined in relation to the whole, 3) consideration of the historical context under which the text was produced and 4) recording of the newly discovered text (Allen, 1995). The outcome of the study was a social system theory of empathy. It proposes empathy as a human developmental feeling attribute that predicts quality outcomes as it 1) contributes to the achievement of standards; 2) enhances the valuing of authority which results in the nurse participating and contributing to the organization; 3) facilitates the use of authority in social systems; 4) empowers the nurse to make decisions and practice with authority at the social system level; 5) promotes perception of professional and organizational status; and 6) contributes to the nurse's perception of alternatives, judgment, decision making, and sensitivity as action is taken. We propose that empathy is critical in the social system because each nurse's ongoing development determines the capacity to be appropriate, effective, and influential while seeing the personal, interpersonal, and professional self in relation to the task at hand. In addition, quality outcomes in nursing social systems depend upon the empathic capacities of individual nurses. Therefore, this theory sets forth a new view of the nurse at the organizational level and predicts designs of care with a nursing practice focus. This social system theory of nursing empathy suggests new directions for studies of empathy and an end to the elusive relationship of empathy to quality outcomes in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting quality outcomes with a social system theory of nursing empathyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlligood, Martha Raileen_US
dc.author.detailsMartha Alligood, PhD, Professor, University of Tennessee, College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: malligoo@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166259-
dc.description.abstractGiven the quality crisis in acute care settings reported in recent research, new systematic approaches designed to produce positive health outcomes are warranted. The purpose of this study was to discover a theory of empathy from the interpretation of nursing science text, King's Interacting Systems and Empathy. A published review of that text noted an implicit theory of empathy in that work. This study was designed to explicate a social system theory of nursing empathy from the text. Two other theories, personal system and interpersonal system, have been discovered. This paper presents the social system theory with an emphasis on predictable quality outcomes for acute care improvements. The research question was: What explicit theory of empathy can be discovered from the examination of the conceptualization of empathy in King's social system? The rationale for the study was to address the need for a theory of nursing empathy since reviews of the literature have repeatedly identified the need for theories of empathy that are specific to nursing. The method utilized was a qualitative design of hermeneutic interpretation of published nursing science text. This approach was used by a research team who carried out the following process: 1) production of meaning through reading, 2) interpretation of the part being examined in relation to the whole, 3) consideration of the historical context under which the text was produced and 4) recording of the newly discovered text (Allen, 1995). The outcome of the study was a social system theory of empathy. It proposes empathy as a human developmental feeling attribute that predicts quality outcomes as it 1) contributes to the achievement of standards; 2) enhances the valuing of authority which results in the nurse participating and contributing to the organization; 3) facilitates the use of authority in social systems; 4) empowers the nurse to make decisions and practice with authority at the social system level; 5) promotes perception of professional and organizational status; and 6) contributes to the nurse's perception of alternatives, judgment, decision making, and sensitivity as action is taken. We propose that empathy is critical in the social system because each nurse's ongoing development determines the capacity to be appropriate, effective, and influential while seeing the personal, interpersonal, and professional self in relation to the task at hand. In addition, quality outcomes in nursing social systems depend upon the empathic capacities of individual nurses. Therefore, this theory sets forth a new view of the nurse at the organizational level and predicts designs of care with a nursing practice focus. This social system theory of nursing empathy suggests new directions for studies of empathy and an end to the elusive relationship of empathy to quality outcomes in nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:30Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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