2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166264
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Psychiatric Hospitalization of High Risk Children
Author(s):
Goren, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Goren, PhD, University of Washington Nursing Program, Tacoma, Washington, USA, email: sgoren@u.washington.edu
Abstract:
The role of psychiatric hospitalization as a consistent predictor of multiple psychiatric hospitalizations throughout childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood has been demonstrated in a number of studies. Parents' inabilty to manage their child's behavior after hospitalization is frequently associated with the inability to generalize hospital-based behavioral programs and medication regimes, and with lack of support during the transition from hospital to home. This pilot project hypothesized that the primary nurse/family relationship developed in the hospital could be used utilized to ameliorate the crisis of the child's transition to the community and to accelerate the family's access to community-based services. This presentation will report on a study of 60 children aged 6-12 with histories of multiple inpatient stays, admitted to a public child psychiatric hospital. Despite active discharge planning, at the time these children were admitted the average time lapse between discharge and the first out-patient visit was 9 weeks. Project design involved providing half the children with weekly home visits and/or phone calls from the primary nurse, focused on adapting the inpatient medication and behavioral management regimes to the home, and facilitating access to the community mental health provider. The other 30 children received the usual treatment and discharge planning provided by the hospital. Subjects' stability of residential placement, utilization of services, and behavioral profile were tracked, and data were collected on costs of service, family satisfaction with services, compliance with prescribed regimes, and access to community services. Descriptive analysis was used to to describe the sample; correlational analysis was done to analyze relationships between the variables within and between data collection intervals. Data will be presented on readmission rates, access to and utililization of community-based mental health services, and stability of residential and educational and placement for the first 6 months of the project.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing Psychiatric Hospitalization of High Risk Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoren, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Goren, PhD, University of Washington Nursing Program, Tacoma, Washington, USA, email: sgoren@u.washington.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166264-
dc.description.abstractThe role of psychiatric hospitalization as a consistent predictor of multiple psychiatric hospitalizations throughout childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood has been demonstrated in a number of studies. Parents' inabilty to manage their child's behavior after hospitalization is frequently associated with the inability to generalize hospital-based behavioral programs and medication regimes, and with lack of support during the transition from hospital to home. This pilot project hypothesized that the primary nurse/family relationship developed in the hospital could be used utilized to ameliorate the crisis of the child's transition to the community and to accelerate the family's access to community-based services. This presentation will report on a study of 60 children aged 6-12 with histories of multiple inpatient stays, admitted to a public child psychiatric hospital. Despite active discharge planning, at the time these children were admitted the average time lapse between discharge and the first out-patient visit was 9 weeks. Project design involved providing half the children with weekly home visits and/or phone calls from the primary nurse, focused on adapting the inpatient medication and behavioral management regimes to the home, and facilitating access to the community mental health provider. The other 30 children received the usual treatment and discharge planning provided by the hospital. Subjects' stability of residential placement, utilization of services, and behavioral profile were tracked, and data were collected on costs of service, family satisfaction with services, compliance with prescribed regimes, and access to community services. Descriptive analysis was used to to describe the sample; correlational analysis was done to analyze relationships between the variables within and between data collection intervals. Data will be presented on readmission rates, access to and utililization of community-based mental health services, and stability of residential and educational and placement for the first 6 months of the project.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:36Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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