An exploration of the advocating practices of nurses on behalf of patients and families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166266
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An exploration of the advocating practices of nurses on behalf of patients and families
Author(s):
Foley, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Foley, PhD, National AMEDD Augmentation Detachment Headquarters, Fort McPherson, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: foleyb@uncw.edu
Abstract:
Consumers are unaware of the many independent activities of the nurse on behalf of the patient and/or family. So many of these practices are invisible to patients, families, and other health care professionals, yet they are part of the day-to-day practice of the nurse. The specific aims of this study are: to describe essential, taken-for-granted advocating practices within nursing that occur day-to-day; to learn the meaning advocating practices have for nurses' in their practice; and to uncover how nurses learn/develop advocating practices. A qualitative approach, using Heideggerian phenomenology, will be used to address the following research questions: a) what comprises the phenomenon of advocating practices of nurses on behalf of patients and families; b) what meaning do advocating practices have for nurses' in their practice; and c) how do nurses learn/develop advocating practices? Fifteen nurses, who have at least five years of nursing experience and who are currently practicing nursing, will be interviewed. This population is deemed appropriate as it will represent nurses who have reached the expert level of nursing practice as described by Benner (1984) and will be the most likely group to be engaged in advocating practices. Interviews will provide the means for indepth exploration of the experience of advocating practices. Transcriptions of the interviews will serve as the data for analysis. Data will be analyzed using the interpretive method of hermeneutics, introduced into nursing by Benner (1984). The process of analysis will proceed in the seven stages described by Diekelmann, Allen & Tanner (1989). Findings, in a pilot study with four participants, revealed that advocating practices derived from caring; knowing the patient/reading the human situation; and moral obligation. Advocating practices included: putting yourself in the place of; reminding; encouraging; protecting; intervening; establishing trust; giving permission; helping one understand; coordinating; and empowering. One implication of this study is that collecting and explicating the advocating practices can provide both a source and understanding of the practical knowledge and expertise of contemporary nursing practice. Another is that understanding advocacy practices and how they are acquired will greatly assist nurse educators to most effectively teach these practices. A third implication is that nurse administrators/managers will be assisted in providing the most conducive environment for these advocating practices to occur.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn exploration of the advocating practices of nurses on behalf of patients and familiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Foley, PhD, National AMEDD Augmentation Detachment Headquarters, Fort McPherson, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: foleyb@uncw.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166266-
dc.description.abstractConsumers are unaware of the many independent activities of the nurse on behalf of the patient and/or family. So many of these practices are invisible to patients, families, and other health care professionals, yet they are part of the day-to-day practice of the nurse. The specific aims of this study are: to describe essential, taken-for-granted advocating practices within nursing that occur day-to-day; to learn the meaning advocating practices have for nurses' in their practice; and to uncover how nurses learn/develop advocating practices. A qualitative approach, using Heideggerian phenomenology, will be used to address the following research questions: a) what comprises the phenomenon of advocating practices of nurses on behalf of patients and families; b) what meaning do advocating practices have for nurses' in their practice; and c) how do nurses learn/develop advocating practices? Fifteen nurses, who have at least five years of nursing experience and who are currently practicing nursing, will be interviewed. This population is deemed appropriate as it will represent nurses who have reached the expert level of nursing practice as described by Benner (1984) and will be the most likely group to be engaged in advocating practices. Interviews will provide the means for indepth exploration of the experience of advocating practices. Transcriptions of the interviews will serve as the data for analysis. Data will be analyzed using the interpretive method of hermeneutics, introduced into nursing by Benner (1984). The process of analysis will proceed in the seven stages described by Diekelmann, Allen & Tanner (1989). Findings, in a pilot study with four participants, revealed that advocating practices derived from caring; knowing the patient/reading the human situation; and moral obligation. Advocating practices included: putting yourself in the place of; reminding; encouraging; protecting; intervening; establishing trust; giving permission; helping one understand; coordinating; and empowering. One implication of this study is that collecting and explicating the advocating practices can provide both a source and understanding of the practical knowledge and expertise of contemporary nursing practice. Another is that understanding advocacy practices and how they are acquired will greatly assist nurse educators to most effectively teach these practices. A third implication is that nurse administrators/managers will be assisted in providing the most conducive environment for these advocating practices to occur.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:38Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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