The Relationship Between The ANA Report Card Core Indicators And Perceptions Of Quality Nursing Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166268
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between The ANA Report Card Core Indicators And Perceptions Of Quality Nursing Care
Author(s):
Moore, Katherine
Author Details:
Katherine Moore, MSN, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: kathy_moore@unc.edu
Abstract:
One of the most significant challenges facing health care today is defining and measuring quality care. The importance of quality care is unquestioned; however, recent dramatic changes in the organization, role id composition of acute care nursing have caused great concern about quality care among health care consumers as well as members of the nursing profession. While it is inarguable that nurses are integral to the delivery of care in all settings, identifying nurse sensitive outcome measures capable of adequately articulating nursing's contribution to care has been extremely difficult. The need for well developed, objective and grounded measures of quality care has never been more pressing. In 1994, the ANA commissioned the development of the "Nursing Report Card" to explore nursing's contribution to patients in acute care settings. From literature review, expert consultation and professional nurse focus groups, 21 structure, process and outcome indicators with strong conceptual ties to the quality of professional nursing care were identified. These 21 indicators, marred by a lack of available data needed to track these measures within and across hospital settings, were subsequently narrowed to 10 core indicators thought to be available in most settings. Widespread study of these indicators of quality care has yet to be conducted. The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which the ANA indicators capture the concept of quality care by examining their relationship with the perceptions of care held by both patients and nurses. The perceptions of patients and nurses are included due to the importance of these indicators in asserting that quality care did or did not occur. Based on a retrospective correlational design, the convenience sample is being drawn from 16 medical-surgical units at an academic medical center in the Southeast. Data are being collected for 18 months from January 1996 through June 1997. Approximately 1300 patients and 500 nurses will participate in the study. Data are being obtained from nurses and patients by their completion of the Nurse's Perception of Quality Scale - Acute Care Version (NPQS-ACV) or the Patient's Perception of Quality Scale - Acute Care Version (PPQS-ACV), respectively. The NPQS-ACV is a 56 item scale measuring 5 dimensions of quality nursing care--Developing a Relationship, Therapeutics, Science of Nursing, Unit Collaboration and Environment/Resources. The PPQS-ACV has 54 items which address 4 dimensions of patient's perceptions of care--Professional Demeanor, Treats Me Like a Individual, Mindfulness, and Responsiveness. Cronbach's coefficient alpha estimates were .84 - .94 for both scales. The 10 core indicators are being obtained from both monthly reports and the hospital data base. Analysis will be conducted using data aggregated at the unit level, with the sample size being 16. Pearson correlations will be used to examine the proposed relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between The ANA Report Card Core Indicators And Perceptions Of Quality Nursing Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Katherineen_US
dc.author.detailsKatherine Moore, MSN, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: kathy_moore@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166268-
dc.description.abstractOne of the most significant challenges facing health care today is defining and measuring quality care. The importance of quality care is unquestioned; however, recent dramatic changes in the organization, role id composition of acute care nursing have caused great concern about quality care among health care consumers as well as members of the nursing profession. While it is inarguable that nurses are integral to the delivery of care in all settings, identifying nurse sensitive outcome measures capable of adequately articulating nursing's contribution to care has been extremely difficult. The need for well developed, objective and grounded measures of quality care has never been more pressing. In 1994, the ANA commissioned the development of the "Nursing Report Card" to explore nursing's contribution to patients in acute care settings. From literature review, expert consultation and professional nurse focus groups, 21 structure, process and outcome indicators with strong conceptual ties to the quality of professional nursing care were identified. These 21 indicators, marred by a lack of available data needed to track these measures within and across hospital settings, were subsequently narrowed to 10 core indicators thought to be available in most settings. Widespread study of these indicators of quality care has yet to be conducted. The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which the ANA indicators capture the concept of quality care by examining their relationship with the perceptions of care held by both patients and nurses. The perceptions of patients and nurses are included due to the importance of these indicators in asserting that quality care did or did not occur. Based on a retrospective correlational design, the convenience sample is being drawn from 16 medical-surgical units at an academic medical center in the Southeast. Data are being collected for 18 months from January 1996 through June 1997. Approximately 1300 patients and 500 nurses will participate in the study. Data are being obtained from nurses and patients by their completion of the Nurse's Perception of Quality Scale - Acute Care Version (NPQS-ACV) or the Patient's Perception of Quality Scale - Acute Care Version (PPQS-ACV), respectively. The NPQS-ACV is a 56 item scale measuring 5 dimensions of quality nursing care--Developing a Relationship, Therapeutics, Science of Nursing, Unit Collaboration and Environment/Resources. The PPQS-ACV has 54 items which address 4 dimensions of patient's perceptions of care--Professional Demeanor, Treats Me Like a Individual, Mindfulness, and Responsiveness. Cronbach's coefficient alpha estimates were .84 - .94 for both scales. The 10 core indicators are being obtained from both monthly reports and the hospital data base. Analysis will be conducted using data aggregated at the unit level, with the sample size being 16. Pearson correlations will be used to examine the proposed relationships.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:41Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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