The Effects Of Perceived Non-work Social Support And Hope Upon Oncology Nurses' Occupational Stress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166269
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects Of Perceived Non-work Social Support And Hope Upon Oncology Nurses' Occupational Stress
Author(s):
McNeal, Linda
Author Details:
Linda McNeal, PhD, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: linda_mcneal@uncg.edu
Abstract:
The specialty of oncology nursing is growing as persons live longer and have cancer diagnoses. Although oncology nurses are prepared to care for cancer patients, the stress of such work can be significant. Occupational stress in the nurse is costly to the nurse, organization, patient, and patient's family. It is important to examine stressors and related variables so support and intervention can be developed to help nurses deal with problems and provide quality patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether relationships existed between the levels of occupational stress, hope, perceived non-work social support from family and friends, and associated professional and personal variables among oncology nurses. The study also explored which factors or behaviors may intensify or relieve occupational stress, and whether the oncology nurse viewed counseling as an option for coping with occupational stress. Participants were 108 oncology nurses from four in-patient hospital units and one out-patient ambulatory clinic in one southeastern medical center. Participants completed four self-report instruments: Gray-Toft and Anderson's Nursing Stress Scale, Snyder's Hope Scale, Procidano and Heller's Perceived Social Support-Family/Friends, and an investigator-developed Participant Profile. The collected data were submitted to analysis by Pearson product-moment coefficient of correlation and regression analyses. For the purposes of this study, statistical significance level was set at alpha = .01. Qualitative analysis was utilized for data from open-ended questions. The data were analyzed for content patterns, categorized by themes, and covalidated by an expert second reader. The participant's level of occupational stress was inversely related to perceptions of social support and to the nurse's number of children. Level of hope in participants was positively related to perceptions of social support. The participant's level of occupational stress was not significantly related to the level of hope, length of experience in oncology nursing, nor to the age of the nurse. The findings related to the exploratory hypothesis support a model for STRESS = PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT + NUMBER OF CHILDREN. In the qualitative analysis, many factors which contributed to the participants' occupational stress could be subsumed under seven previously identified factors. They did not, however, contribute to the same degree. A majority of study participants perceived counseling as a potential resource for coping with occupational stress. Implications of these research findings for nursing and counseling include the benefit to nurses from employer-sponsored innovative approaches to counseling which may promote greater social support and effective coping skills among the nurses. Counselors may utilize the information to better assist the nurse-client to focus energy on the development of adaptive coping strategies and the enhancement of social support systems.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects Of Perceived Non-work Social Support And Hope Upon Oncology Nurses' Occupational Stressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNeal, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda McNeal, PhD, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: linda_mcneal@uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166269-
dc.description.abstractThe specialty of oncology nursing is growing as persons live longer and have cancer diagnoses. Although oncology nurses are prepared to care for cancer patients, the stress of such work can be significant. Occupational stress in the nurse is costly to the nurse, organization, patient, and patient's family. It is important to examine stressors and related variables so support and intervention can be developed to help nurses deal with problems and provide quality patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether relationships existed between the levels of occupational stress, hope, perceived non-work social support from family and friends, and associated professional and personal variables among oncology nurses. The study also explored which factors or behaviors may intensify or relieve occupational stress, and whether the oncology nurse viewed counseling as an option for coping with occupational stress. Participants were 108 oncology nurses from four in-patient hospital units and one out-patient ambulatory clinic in one southeastern medical center. Participants completed four self-report instruments: Gray-Toft and Anderson's Nursing Stress Scale, Snyder's Hope Scale, Procidano and Heller's Perceived Social Support-Family/Friends, and an investigator-developed Participant Profile. The collected data were submitted to analysis by Pearson product-moment coefficient of correlation and regression analyses. For the purposes of this study, statistical significance level was set at alpha = .01. Qualitative analysis was utilized for data from open-ended questions. The data were analyzed for content patterns, categorized by themes, and covalidated by an expert second reader. The participant's level of occupational stress was inversely related to perceptions of social support and to the nurse's number of children. Level of hope in participants was positively related to perceptions of social support. The participant's level of occupational stress was not significantly related to the level of hope, length of experience in oncology nursing, nor to the age of the nurse. The findings related to the exploratory hypothesis support a model for STRESS = PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT + NUMBER OF CHILDREN. In the qualitative analysis, many factors which contributed to the participants' occupational stress could be subsumed under seven previously identified factors. They did not, however, contribute to the same degree. A majority of study participants perceived counseling as a potential resource for coping with occupational stress. Implications of these research findings for nursing and counseling include the benefit to nurses from employer-sponsored innovative approaches to counseling which may promote greater social support and effective coping skills among the nurses. Counselors may utilize the information to better assist the nurse-client to focus energy on the development of adaptive coping strategies and the enhancement of social support systems.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:42Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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