2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166270
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting persistence in nursing students: A model of student retention
Author(s):
Shelton, Elisabeth
Author Details:
Elisabeth Shelton, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Director of Accelerated Health Programs, West Virginia University, School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: eshelton@hsc.wvu.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore factors related to persistence in nontraditional, associate degree nursing students. The Shelton Model of Student Retention, a newly developed model synthesized from and combining the psychological and sociological perspectives of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy and Tinto's theory of student retention, was the theoretical framework for the study and was partially tested in the study. Participants were 458 nontraditional associate degree nursing students who were categorized according to their persistence: those who had persisted continuously throughout a nursing program, those who had withdrawn voluntarily at some time during a program, and those who had been required to withdraw because of academic failure. The selected predictor variables, academic self-efficacy expectations, academic outcome expectations, and perceived faculty support were measured, respectively, by the Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning Scale, the Outcomes Expectations Questionnaire -- Associate Degree Nursing, and the Perceived Faculty Support Scale. Discriminant analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the combination of academic self-efficacy expectations, academic outcome expectations, and perceived faculty support would predict persistence better than any one variable alone. While the hypothesis was not supported, a single variable, perceived faculty support, was related to persistence, such that students with higher perceived faculty support were more likely to voluntarily continue in a nursing program until graduation and were more likely to be successful academically. Students with higher perceived faculty support also had higher outcome expectations of earning an associate degree in nursing. Faculty support involved both psychological support, directed at promoting a sense of competency and self-worth, and functional support, directed at the achievement of tasks to accomplish in order to reach the goals of persistence and academic success. Multiple regression analyses showed that there were significant persistence group differences in selected background variables, demonstrating the direct relationship between background variables and persistence. Specifically, students who voluntarily persisted and were successful academically were found to have greater financial resources, fewer employment hours, a higher level of prior education, and higher college grade point average than students who did not persist. The study expanded on current knowledge and theory by considering the interaction of background variables, internal processes, and external support factors in predicting persistence, and provided evidence of the relationship between faculty support and retention in associate degree nursing students. A program of student retention was proposed based on the Shelton Model of Student Retention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting persistence in nursing students: A model of student retentionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShelton, Elisabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElisabeth Shelton, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Director of Accelerated Health Programs, West Virginia University, School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: eshelton@hsc.wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166270-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore factors related to persistence in nontraditional, associate degree nursing students. The Shelton Model of Student Retention, a newly developed model synthesized from and combining the psychological and sociological perspectives of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy and Tinto's theory of student retention, was the theoretical framework for the study and was partially tested in the study. Participants were 458 nontraditional associate degree nursing students who were categorized according to their persistence: those who had persisted continuously throughout a nursing program, those who had withdrawn voluntarily at some time during a program, and those who had been required to withdraw because of academic failure. The selected predictor variables, academic self-efficacy expectations, academic outcome expectations, and perceived faculty support were measured, respectively, by the Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning Scale, the Outcomes Expectations Questionnaire -- Associate Degree Nursing, and the Perceived Faculty Support Scale. Discriminant analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the combination of academic self-efficacy expectations, academic outcome expectations, and perceived faculty support would predict persistence better than any one variable alone. While the hypothesis was not supported, a single variable, perceived faculty support, was related to persistence, such that students with higher perceived faculty support were more likely to voluntarily continue in a nursing program until graduation and were more likely to be successful academically. Students with higher perceived faculty support also had higher outcome expectations of earning an associate degree in nursing. Faculty support involved both psychological support, directed at promoting a sense of competency and self-worth, and functional support, directed at the achievement of tasks to accomplish in order to reach the goals of persistence and academic success. Multiple regression analyses showed that there were significant persistence group differences in selected background variables, demonstrating the direct relationship between background variables and persistence. Specifically, students who voluntarily persisted and were successful academically were found to have greater financial resources, fewer employment hours, a higher level of prior education, and higher college grade point average than students who did not persist. The study expanded on current knowledge and theory by considering the interaction of background variables, internal processes, and external support factors in predicting persistence, and provided evidence of the relationship between faculty support and retention in associate degree nursing students. A program of student retention was proposed based on the Shelton Model of Student Retention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:43Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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