The Association of High Serum Cholesterol and Overweight in Japanese and AmericanChildren

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166271
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Association of High Serum Cholesterol and Overweight in Japanese and AmericanChildren
Author(s):
Harrell, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Harrell, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Joanne_harrell@unc.edu
Abstract:
AIMS: This analysis compared the presence of overweight (Rohrer index (RI) > 140) and high total serum cholesterol (> 200 mg/dl) in ten-year-old Japanese and American children. SUBJECTS: (n = 1,109, all 10 years old). The Japanese children were part of the GIFU Heart Study, in Gifu, Japan (n = 460, 55.0% male). The American (USA) children are a subset of subjects in the Cardiovascular Health In Children (CHIC) study (n = 649: 497 white children, 55.1% male, and 152 black children, 53.9% male). METHODS: Variables directly measured were weight, height, and cholesterol; the Rohrer Index was calculated (weight in kg divided by height in meters cubed). Data were analyzed with Fishers' exact test to compare cholesterol by weight categories in six groups: Japanese males, black USA males, white USA males, Japanese, black USA and white USA females. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Using the definitions of underweight as RI < 109, normal weight RI = 110-139, and overweight RI > 140, most of the children in all groups were normal weight (73% of Japanese males, 62% of white USA and 63% of black USA males; 66% of Japanese females, 55% of white and 47% of black USA females). The Japanese children had lower mean RI but higher total serum cholesterol than white USA children. Mean cholesterol was compared by 3 categories of overweight. For males, the pattern was different for Japanese and USA children, with the mean values in Japanese boys rising from 160.4 mg/dl for underweight to 179.3 for overweight. However, in USA white males, cholesterol was lowest in those who were normal weight. Cholesterol was highest in black USA males. The pattern of cholesterol by weight category was similar for Japanese and white USA girls, with cholesterol steadily increasing with weight category in each group. This pattern was reversed in black American girls, with the highest cholesterol found in those who were underweight, and lowest in those who were overweight. Fishers' exact test was used to compare the association of high cholesterol with overweight (vs both underweight and nomnal weight) in each of the 6 groups. In males, there was a significant association in Japanese (p = 0.011) and in both white (p = 0.001) and black Americans (p = 0.005). In girls, the association between overweight and high cholesterol was only significant in white Americans (p = 0.009). It was not significant in Japanese girls (p = 0.129) or in black USA girls (p = 0.068). We conclude that high cholesterol is associated with overweight in Japanese and USA 10 year old boys (both white and black), and in white USA girls but not in Japanese girls or black USA girls. Furthermore, the cholesterol levels of Japanese children were slightly higher than USA white children. and may indicate a trend that in the future could lead to a significant rise in prevalence of cardiovascular diseases; particularly coronary heart disease, in the Japanese population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Association of High Serum Cholesterol and Overweight in Japanese and AmericanChildrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarrell, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Harrell, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Joanne_harrell@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166271-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: This analysis compared the presence of overweight (Rohrer index (RI) > 140) and high total serum cholesterol (> 200 mg/dl) in ten-year-old Japanese and American children. SUBJECTS: (n = 1,109, all 10 years old). The Japanese children were part of the GIFU Heart Study, in Gifu, Japan (n = 460, 55.0% male). The American (USA) children are a subset of subjects in the Cardiovascular Health In Children (CHIC) study (n = 649: 497 white children, 55.1% male, and 152 black children, 53.9% male). METHODS: Variables directly measured were weight, height, and cholesterol; the Rohrer Index was calculated (weight in kg divided by height in meters cubed). Data were analyzed with Fishers' exact test to compare cholesterol by weight categories in six groups: Japanese males, black USA males, white USA males, Japanese, black USA and white USA females. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Using the definitions of underweight as RI < 109, normal weight RI = 110-139, and overweight RI > 140, most of the children in all groups were normal weight (73% of Japanese males, 62% of white USA and 63% of black USA males; 66% of Japanese females, 55% of white and 47% of black USA females). The Japanese children had lower mean RI but higher total serum cholesterol than white USA children. Mean cholesterol was compared by 3 categories of overweight. For males, the pattern was different for Japanese and USA children, with the mean values in Japanese boys rising from 160.4 mg/dl for underweight to 179.3 for overweight. However, in USA white males, cholesterol was lowest in those who were normal weight. Cholesterol was highest in black USA males. The pattern of cholesterol by weight category was similar for Japanese and white USA girls, with cholesterol steadily increasing with weight category in each group. This pattern was reversed in black American girls, with the highest cholesterol found in those who were underweight, and lowest in those who were overweight. Fishers' exact test was used to compare the association of high cholesterol with overweight (vs both underweight and nomnal weight) in each of the 6 groups. In males, there was a significant association in Japanese (p = 0.011) and in both white (p = 0.001) and black Americans (p = 0.005). In girls, the association between overweight and high cholesterol was only significant in white Americans (p = 0.009). It was not significant in Japanese girls (p = 0.129) or in black USA girls (p = 0.068). We conclude that high cholesterol is associated with overweight in Japanese and USA 10 year old boys (both white and black), and in white USA girls but not in Japanese girls or black USA girls. Furthermore, the cholesterol levels of Japanese children were slightly higher than USA white children. and may indicate a trend that in the future could lead to a significant rise in prevalence of cardiovascular diseases; particularly coronary heart disease, in the Japanese population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:44Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.