2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166272
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model of Children's Preoperative Coping and Recovery Outcomes
Author(s):
LaMontagne, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
This study extends previous research on examining children's coping with minor surgery to children having major surgery, and the factors that influence the choice of coping strategy and its relationship to postoperative outcomes. A model was tested to assess children's preoperative coping with major orthopedic surgery and how coping affects both short and long term recovery outcomes. Each of the possible paths relating coping to two ditferent postoperative outcomes (anxiety and return to normal activities) were addressed. Ninety children, ages 8 to 17, participated. Data were collected the day before surgery, the second postoperative day, and at three, six and nine month recovery periods. A respecified model was not significantly different from the data (p=.90), indicating a good fit. Children who were older, more anxious and more internal in locus of control exhibited more vigilant coping. Avoidant coping was associated with less anxiety two days postoperatively, and vigilant coping was associated with return to normal activities over the course of recovery. The results of this study may be used to design interventions to bolster children's coping and recovery outcomes. The results of this study also support further examination of both the short and long term effects of coping on recovery from major surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model of Children's Preoperative Coping and Recovery Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaMontagne, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@mcmail.vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166272-
dc.description.abstractThis study extends previous research on examining children's coping with minor surgery to children having major surgery, and the factors that influence the choice of coping strategy and its relationship to postoperative outcomes. A model was tested to assess children's preoperative coping with major orthopedic surgery and how coping affects both short and long term recovery outcomes. Each of the possible paths relating coping to two ditferent postoperative outcomes (anxiety and return to normal activities) were addressed. Ninety children, ages 8 to 17, participated. Data were collected the day before surgery, the second postoperative day, and at three, six and nine month recovery periods. A respecified model was not significantly different from the data (p=.90), indicating a good fit. Children who were older, more anxious and more internal in locus of control exhibited more vigilant coping. Avoidant coping was associated with less anxiety two days postoperatively, and vigilant coping was associated with return to normal activities over the course of recovery. The results of this study may be used to design interventions to bolster children's coping and recovery outcomes. The results of this study also support further examination of both the short and long term effects of coping on recovery from major surgery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:46Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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