2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166274
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beliefs and perceptions about children in pain
Author(s):
Margolius, Francine
Author Details:
Francine Margolius, EdD, Associate Professor, Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, email: margolfr@musc.edu
Abstract:
A survey was conducted to examine beliefs related to pain in children and perceptions of effective pain management practices among 335 nursing personnel in a pediatric setting. Of the 335 surveys distributed, 228 (68%) were returned comprising the sample. The sample consisted of 183 RN's (82%), 24 LPN's (11%) and 15 PCA's (7%). Demographic data and information about participants interest in learning more about assessment and management of pain in children was obtained. ANOVA, Factor Analysis, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Significant differences in beliefs and perceptions about pain management were found among personnel in various roles. Nursing education correlated positively with both beliefs and perceptions of current practice. The most prevalent belief was that infants/children seldom need medication for the relief of pain after general surgery. Two other common beliefs were that crying was the only way to know if infants are in pain and children do not feel pain because of their immature nervous system. Almost half of the participants perceived that pediatric nurses do not use a consistent approach when assessing a child in pain. Survey participants also identified issues they perceived as hindering pain management in children. These issues included feelings of powerlessness among nursing personnel, limited collaboration between nurses and physicians, lack of information about effective pain management strategies for neonates/infants, and limited physician education about pediatric pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeliefs and perceptions about children in painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMargolius, Francineen_US
dc.author.detailsFrancine Margolius, EdD, Associate Professor, Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, email: margolfr@musc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166274-
dc.description.abstractA survey was conducted to examine beliefs related to pain in children and perceptions of effective pain management practices among 335 nursing personnel in a pediatric setting. Of the 335 surveys distributed, 228 (68%) were returned comprising the sample. The sample consisted of 183 RN's (82%), 24 LPN's (11%) and 15 PCA's (7%). Demographic data and information about participants interest in learning more about assessment and management of pain in children was obtained. ANOVA, Factor Analysis, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Significant differences in beliefs and perceptions about pain management were found among personnel in various roles. Nursing education correlated positively with both beliefs and perceptions of current practice. The most prevalent belief was that infants/children seldom need medication for the relief of pain after general surgery. Two other common beliefs were that crying was the only way to know if infants are in pain and children do not feel pain because of their immature nervous system. Almost half of the participants perceived that pediatric nurses do not use a consistent approach when assessing a child in pain. Survey participants also identified issues they perceived as hindering pain management in children. These issues included feelings of powerlessness among nursing personnel, limited collaboration between nurses and physicians, lack of information about effective pain management strategies for neonates/infants, and limited physician education about pediatric pain management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:48Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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