The Relationship Between Work And Personal Factors And Drug Use Among Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166276
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between Work And Personal Factors And Drug Use Among Registered Nurses
Author(s):
Staten, Ruth
Author Details:
Ruth Staten, PhD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: rrstat00@pop.uky.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of drug use among registered nurses and to explore the relationship between work and personal factors and drug use among registered nurses. A stratified random sample of 2000 registered nurses who were currently employed in nursing positions were mailed questionnaires. A response rate of 48.8% (n=975) was achieved. The survey included questions about demographic information, family history, current personal stressors, work environment, general well-being and drug and alcohol use and negative experiences with alcohol and other drugs. Findings indicated that these nurses were similar in drug use to other women. Twenty percent of working registered nurses were current cigarette users. Forty-seven percent had used alcohol in the last 30 days with 2.5% being heavy drinkers (5 drinks on five or more days). Use of illicit drugs was rare. Working registered nurses tended to initiate drug use in late adolescence or early adulthood. Correlation analyses revealed drug use to be most strongly related to personal factors including being separated, divorced or co-habitating, having stressful family life events and high levels of daily stressors, being male, and being less involved with religious activities. Work factors significantly related to drug use were working in large hospitals on the night or weekend shift. Low levels of peer cohesion and involvement, a lack of clarity, physical comfort and task orientation were significantly associated with drug use. Multiple regression with backward elimination indicated that gender, daily stressors, stressful family life events, worship attendance, and number of employees in institution were included in the best predictive model for lifetime negative experiences with alcohol and other drugs [F, (5,635) = 28.25, p<.0001].
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Work And Personal Factors And Drug Use Among Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStaten, Ruthen_US
dc.author.detailsRuth Staten, PhD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: rrstat00@pop.uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166276-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe patterns of drug use among registered nurses and to explore the relationship between work and personal factors and drug use among registered nurses. A stratified random sample of 2000 registered nurses who were currently employed in nursing positions were mailed questionnaires. A response rate of 48.8% (n=975) was achieved. The survey included questions about demographic information, family history, current personal stressors, work environment, general well-being and drug and alcohol use and negative experiences with alcohol and other drugs. Findings indicated that these nurses were similar in drug use to other women. Twenty percent of working registered nurses were current cigarette users. Forty-seven percent had used alcohol in the last 30 days with 2.5% being heavy drinkers (5 drinks on five or more days). Use of illicit drugs was rare. Working registered nurses tended to initiate drug use in late adolescence or early adulthood. Correlation analyses revealed drug use to be most strongly related to personal factors including being separated, divorced or co-habitating, having stressful family life events and high levels of daily stressors, being male, and being less involved with religious activities. Work factors significantly related to drug use were working in large hospitals on the night or weekend shift. Low levels of peer cohesion and involvement, a lack of clarity, physical comfort and task orientation were significantly associated with drug use. Multiple regression with backward elimination indicated that gender, daily stressors, stressful family life events, worship attendance, and number of employees in institution were included in the best predictive model for lifetime negative experiences with alcohol and other drugs [F, (5,635) = 28.25, p<.0001].en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:50Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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