A Model for Assessing Health Beliefs and Attitudes of Low Income African American Women in Relation to Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166278
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model for Assessing Health Beliefs and Attitudes of Low Income African American Women in Relation to Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Screening
Author(s):
Baldwin, Dee
Author Details:
Dee Baldwin, PhD, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: nurdmb@langate.gsu.edu
Abstract:
The incidence and mortality rates for cancer are increasing at an unprecedented proportion in the African American community. Breast cancer alone is one of the most common malignancies in the U.S., second only to lung cancr in women. For the past thirty years there has been a great disparity in the rate of breast cancer survival between African American and White women. African American women continue to have the highest numbers of new cases of breast cancer in the nation. Data related to cervical cancer among African American women are similar to those related to African American women and breast cancer. Women who are poor, have little education or elderly are less likely to have a PAP test, and are less likely to be screened. In addition to these alarming statistics, the current models for describing attitudes and the health beliefs of African American women have met with little success in predicting their participation in early detection and screening practices. These models have used White middle class women as the standard, with very few studies designed for African American women or members of other cultural groups. Moreover, all of the models tend to be behavioral oriented; lack cultural sensitivity; and tend to foster pejorative conclusions about African American women's participation in screening practices related to cancer prevention. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present a model designed to assess the health beliefs and attitudes of low income African American women in relation to breast and cervical cancer screening practices. The model uses a phenomenological and afrocentric approach to gain an understanding of the lived experience of low income African American women who engage in health seeking behaviors related to mammography and PAP smear testing. Unlike current approaches that are behavioral oriented, this model offers a human science approach that illuminates the world view of low income African American women and seeks to understand and explain their common every day living practices. The model also describes how the day to day living practices and the afrocentric world view impact decision making related to health seeking behaviors. Moreover, the model focuses on the strengths of low income African American women including their resiliency and strong sense of survival. The methodology for deriving the afrocentric model used a focus group format with follow-up one to one interviews with 1-1 participants. Data collection and analysis occurred over a two year period. The paper will delineate the methodology and the steps involved in the development of the model. Implications for how this model can be used by practitioners in community health settings and nursing education will also be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model for Assessing Health Beliefs and Attitudes of Low Income African American Women in Relation to Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Screeningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Deeen_US
dc.author.detailsDee Baldwin, PhD, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: nurdmb@langate.gsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166278-
dc.description.abstractThe incidence and mortality rates for cancer are increasing at an unprecedented proportion in the African American community. Breast cancer alone is one of the most common malignancies in the U.S., second only to lung cancr in women. For the past thirty years there has been a great disparity in the rate of breast cancer survival between African American and White women. African American women continue to have the highest numbers of new cases of breast cancer in the nation. Data related to cervical cancer among African American women are similar to those related to African American women and breast cancer. Women who are poor, have little education or elderly are less likely to have a PAP test, and are less likely to be screened. In addition to these alarming statistics, the current models for describing attitudes and the health beliefs of African American women have met with little success in predicting their participation in early detection and screening practices. These models have used White middle class women as the standard, with very few studies designed for African American women or members of other cultural groups. Moreover, all of the models tend to be behavioral oriented; lack cultural sensitivity; and tend to foster pejorative conclusions about African American women's participation in screening practices related to cancer prevention. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present a model designed to assess the health beliefs and attitudes of low income African American women in relation to breast and cervical cancer screening practices. The model uses a phenomenological and afrocentric approach to gain an understanding of the lived experience of low income African American women who engage in health seeking behaviors related to mammography and PAP smear testing. Unlike current approaches that are behavioral oriented, this model offers a human science approach that illuminates the world view of low income African American women and seeks to understand and explain their common every day living practices. The model also describes how the day to day living practices and the afrocentric world view impact decision making related to health seeking behaviors. Moreover, the model focuses on the strengths of low income African American women including their resiliency and strong sense of survival. The methodology for deriving the afrocentric model used a focus group format with follow-up one to one interviews with 1-1 participants. Data collection and analysis occurred over a two year period. The paper will delineate the methodology and the steps involved in the development of the model. Implications for how this model can be used by practitioners in community health settings and nursing education will also be addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:53Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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