When protocols are not enough: Intuition as essential knowing for advanced practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166281
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
When protocols are not enough: Intuition as essential knowing for advanced practice
Author(s):
Kosowski, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Kosowski, PhD, Professor, Kennesaw State University School of Nursing, Kennesaw, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: mkosowsk@westga.edu
Abstract:
Advanced practice nurses are key players and leaders in the emerging health care system of this new millennium. While this century brings new opportunities for expanded nursing roles, it also presents challenges for nurses to create strategies that sustain holism and caring as the integral to nurse practitioner practice. Intuitive knowing reflects a holistic understanding of the present, associated with memories of the past, and a relational and contextual synthesis that results in an accurate perception of the whole without linear step by step analysis. As such, intuition is essential to the science and art of nursing. Nurse practitioners who embrace and integrate intuitive decision making into their practices are better prepared to meet the challenges of their expanding nursing roles and the evolving health care system. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to discover, describe and analyze the stories of advanced practice nurses who utilized intuitive knowing in clinical decision-making. Using a reflexive dialectic interview approach, we asked the participants to describe experiences in their roles as family nurse practitioners when they integrated intuitive knowing in clinical decision making with clients. Using an interpretive phenomenological approach, data were analyzed and examined from critical social theory and feminist perspectives. Methodological rigor was achieved using trustworthiness criteria as described by Lincoln and Guba (1985). Several themes emerged from the data and included the notion that intuitive decision making by family nurse practitioners involved not only "knowing the patient," but also personal confidence, autonomy, and assertiveness. Nurse practitioners described behaviors that included "taking risks," "being open and spontaneous," and "responding to an elusiveness" that may be in opposition to physician protocols. For these participants, intuitive decision-making was consistently situated by contextual circumstances, time constraints, and relationships with others. Findings from this study suggest implications for nurse practitioner educational experiences, research and practice. By giving voice to experiences of intuitive decision making in family nurse practice, this research holds the potential to empower and emancipate nurse practitioners from the constraints of patriarchal linear reasoning. This conversation adds depth to Carpers' (1978) pattern of personal knowing, and underscores the importance of further inquiry into the emerging roles of nurse practitioners who are in strategic positions to shape the health care communities of this new millennium.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhen protocols are not enough: Intuition as essential knowing for advanced practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKosowski, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Kosowski, PhD, Professor, Kennesaw State University School of Nursing, Kennesaw, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: mkosowsk@westga.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166281-
dc.description.abstractAdvanced practice nurses are key players and leaders in the emerging health care system of this new millennium. While this century brings new opportunities for expanded nursing roles, it also presents challenges for nurses to create strategies that sustain holism and caring as the integral to nurse practitioner practice. Intuitive knowing reflects a holistic understanding of the present, associated with memories of the past, and a relational and contextual synthesis that results in an accurate perception of the whole without linear step by step analysis. As such, intuition is essential to the science and art of nursing. Nurse practitioners who embrace and integrate intuitive decision making into their practices are better prepared to meet the challenges of their expanding nursing roles and the evolving health care system. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to discover, describe and analyze the stories of advanced practice nurses who utilized intuitive knowing in clinical decision-making. Using a reflexive dialectic interview approach, we asked the participants to describe experiences in their roles as family nurse practitioners when they integrated intuitive knowing in clinical decision making with clients. Using an interpretive phenomenological approach, data were analyzed and examined from critical social theory and feminist perspectives. Methodological rigor was achieved using trustworthiness criteria as described by Lincoln and Guba (1985). Several themes emerged from the data and included the notion that intuitive decision making by family nurse practitioners involved not only "knowing the patient," but also personal confidence, autonomy, and assertiveness. Nurse practitioners described behaviors that included "taking risks," "being open and spontaneous," and "responding to an elusiveness" that may be in opposition to physician protocols. For these participants, intuitive decision-making was consistently situated by contextual circumstances, time constraints, and relationships with others. Findings from this study suggest implications for nurse practitioner educational experiences, research and practice. By giving voice to experiences of intuitive decision making in family nurse practice, this research holds the potential to empower and emancipate nurse practitioners from the constraints of patriarchal linear reasoning. This conversation adds depth to Carpers' (1978) pattern of personal knowing, and underscores the importance of further inquiry into the emerging roles of nurse practitioners who are in strategic positions to shape the health care communities of this new millennium.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:56Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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