Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening: Community Strategies forImplementing a Cancer Prevention Program for Low Income African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166283
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening: Community Strategies forImplementing a Cancer Prevention Program for Low Income African American Women
Author(s):
Williams, Jackie
Author Details:
Jackie Williams, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Georgia State University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jackie.williams@gpc.edu
Abstract:
Statement of Problem: Educating low-income African American women about the importance of early detection and screening for breast and cervical cancer is very challenging. The inherent difficulties are compounded when breast cancer educational intervention occurs in a low underserved community, where health promotion/prevention is a low priority and research is viewed with suspicion. Purpose: To reduce the risks and enhance early detection of breast cancer in low- income African American women through a culturally-appropriate community-based educational program designed to increase breast and cervical cancer awareness and screening. Effective community strategies to enhance participation will be presented based on the researchers' experiences with low-income African American communities. Method: This project used a focus group format to provide a culturally appropriate breast and cervical cancer intervention in three low income housing communities. Two African American researchers contacted key leaders and "gatekeepers" of these communities to recruit women for the project. A pre/post assessment of cancer knowledge level, attitudes and health care practices was completed by all participants. Strategies such as recruitment of key leaders, coalition building and outreach efforts were used to increase participation in the educational intervention. Results: The program represents a unique and powerful community-based intervention that aims to reach low income African American communities. The community strategies that worked well included contacting key gatekeepers, disseminating information in the community, providing other services to the community (health education, volunteer service), familiarity with the community, openness and willingness to be flexible in the research approach, and attendance at key community group meetings. Conclusions: Community based cancer screening initiatives in low income African American communities must include key community members in the planning and implementation phase. Recruitment of participants for the project was more successful when initial contacts were made with the community "gatekeeper." In conducting research in low income African American communities, special attention must be given to the involvement of key leaders, coalition building and outreach efforts. Community-based cancer screening efforts that are planned with community input can increase participation in cancer screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening: Community Strategies forImplementing a Cancer Prevention Program for Low Income African American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jackieen_US
dc.author.detailsJackie Williams, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Georgia State University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jackie.williams@gpc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166283-
dc.description.abstractStatement of Problem: Educating low-income African American women about the importance of early detection and screening for breast and cervical cancer is very challenging. The inherent difficulties are compounded when breast cancer educational intervention occurs in a low underserved community, where health promotion/prevention is a low priority and research is viewed with suspicion. Purpose: To reduce the risks and enhance early detection of breast cancer in low- income African American women through a culturally-appropriate community-based educational program designed to increase breast and cervical cancer awareness and screening. Effective community strategies to enhance participation will be presented based on the researchers' experiences with low-income African American communities. Method: This project used a focus group format to provide a culturally appropriate breast and cervical cancer intervention in three low income housing communities. Two African American researchers contacted key leaders and "gatekeepers" of these communities to recruit women for the project. A pre/post assessment of cancer knowledge level, attitudes and health care practices was completed by all participants. Strategies such as recruitment of key leaders, coalition building and outreach efforts were used to increase participation in the educational intervention. Results: The program represents a unique and powerful community-based intervention that aims to reach low income African American communities. The community strategies that worked well included contacting key gatekeepers, disseminating information in the community, providing other services to the community (health education, volunteer service), familiarity with the community, openness and willingness to be flexible in the research approach, and attendance at key community group meetings. Conclusions: Community based cancer screening initiatives in low income African American communities must include key community members in the planning and implementation phase. Recruitment of participants for the project was more successful when initial contacts were made with the community "gatekeeper." In conducting research in low income African American communities, special attention must be given to the involvement of key leaders, coalition building and outreach efforts. Community-based cancer screening efforts that are planned with community input can increase participation in cancer screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:43:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:43:59Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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