2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166284
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Moral Distress And Participation In Ethical Decision Making
Author(s):
Corley, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Corley, PhD, Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: mccorley@hsc.vcu.edu
Abstract:
The Moral Distress Scale was developed to measure the stress intensive care unit nurses experience when institutional constraints makes it difficult or impossible to do what they believe ethically needs to be done in providing patient care. The instrument is based on Wilkinson' s qualitative research and a review of the literature on frequently encountered ethical dilemmas. The content validity index (CVI) was 100% agreement by three nursing ethics experts. Test-retest was r=.86, p<.01. Factor analysis using varimax rotation yielded three theoretically meaningful factors: (a) participating in care not agreed with or ignoring actions one should take; (b) providing aggressive care for the hopelessly ill; and (c) not addressing impending death honestly. Cronbach's alpha was .81, .93, and .85 for each factor respectively. Several other researchers have used the instrument and their findings will be compared to the findings in several studies by the investigator in intensive care units, non-intensive care units, and a post-anesthesia care unit The Participation in Ethical Decision-Making Index, a 15-item scale, was designed to assess the frequency with which nurses participated in discussions that affect institutional decision on ethical issues. Test-retest reliability using Pearson's correlation was .81; Cronbach's alpha was .83 in a sample of 75 nurses. The instrument does not address whether the opportunity to be involved is related to the absence of the targeted ethical dilemma or the lack of opportunity due to exclusion by other decision makers or by the nurse's own reluctance.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Moral Distress And Participation In Ethical Decision Makingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorley, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Corley, PhD, Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: mccorley@hsc.vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166284-
dc.description.abstractThe Moral Distress Scale was developed to measure the stress intensive care unit nurses experience when institutional constraints makes it difficult or impossible to do what they believe ethically needs to be done in providing patient care. The instrument is based on Wilkinson' s qualitative research and a review of the literature on frequently encountered ethical dilemmas. The content validity index (CVI) was 100% agreement by three nursing ethics experts. Test-retest was r=.86, p<.01. Factor analysis using varimax rotation yielded three theoretically meaningful factors: (a) participating in care not agreed with or ignoring actions one should take; (b) providing aggressive care for the hopelessly ill; and (c) not addressing impending death honestly. Cronbach's alpha was .81, .93, and .85 for each factor respectively. Several other researchers have used the instrument and their findings will be compared to the findings in several studies by the investigator in intensive care units, non-intensive care units, and a post-anesthesia care unit The Participation in Ethical Decision-Making Index, a 15-item scale, was designed to assess the frequency with which nurses participated in discussions that affect institutional decision on ethical issues. Test-retest reliability using Pearson's correlation was .81; Cronbach's alpha was .83 in a sample of 75 nurses. The instrument does not address whether the opportunity to be involved is related to the absence of the targeted ethical dilemma or the lack of opportunity due to exclusion by other decision makers or by the nurse's own reluctance.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:00Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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