2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166288
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Moral Reasoning And Clinical Knowledge Development
Author(s):
Hamric, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Hamric, PhD, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing Graduate Nursing Program, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: ahamri@lsumc.edu
Abstract:
The ethical concept of moral reasoning has been studied extensively within the framework of justice-based reasoning, primarily because of the existence of two reliable and valid measures, the Defining Issues Test (Rest, 1986) and the Moral Judgment Interview (Kohlberg, 1976). However, care-based reasoning has not been similarly studied. The Case-Justice Inventory (CJI), a quantitative measure using the scenarios of Rest's Defining Issues Test, will be described. The CJI was developed to measure both care-based and justice-based moral reasoning. It presents four dilemmas, asks the subject what s/he would do in response, and asks him/her to rank (on a four point Likert scale) 12 considerations for their importance in making the decision. Six of the items are based on Gilligan's description of care-based reasoning and six are based on Kohlberg's justice-based reasoning; scores are derived by summing the importance ranking of these two item sets for each of the four scenarios. The CJI has been pilot tested with 54 RNs in one tertiary care center, and later with 214 RNs from three different institutions. Strengths and limitations of the instrument will be discussed. Nurse's formal education and years of practice experience have not been consistently found to relate to the level of moral reasoning in studies. One possible reason for inconsistent findings is that it is the learning from experience that changes the nurse's practice, not just the experience itself. Benner (1984) found that nurses evidenced differing clinical knowledge levels of novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient and expert. Other authors have identified additional competencies of the advanced practitioner (Hamric, 1989). Level of clinical knowledge was found in one study to be a more sensitive predictor of nurse activism in an ethical dilemma than either formal education or years of practice experience. An instrument developed to allow a nurse to self-report his/her clinical knowledge level will be described.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Moral Reasoning And Clinical Knowledge Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamric, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Hamric, PhD, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing Graduate Nursing Program, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: ahamri@lsumc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166288-
dc.description.abstractThe ethical concept of moral reasoning has been studied extensively within the framework of justice-based reasoning, primarily because of the existence of two reliable and valid measures, the Defining Issues Test (Rest, 1986) and the Moral Judgment Interview (Kohlberg, 1976). However, care-based reasoning has not been similarly studied. The Case-Justice Inventory (CJI), a quantitative measure using the scenarios of Rest's Defining Issues Test, will be described. The CJI was developed to measure both care-based and justice-based moral reasoning. It presents four dilemmas, asks the subject what s/he would do in response, and asks him/her to rank (on a four point Likert scale) 12 considerations for their importance in making the decision. Six of the items are based on Gilligan's description of care-based reasoning and six are based on Kohlberg's justice-based reasoning; scores are derived by summing the importance ranking of these two item sets for each of the four scenarios. The CJI has been pilot tested with 54 RNs in one tertiary care center, and later with 214 RNs from three different institutions. Strengths and limitations of the instrument will be discussed. Nurse's formal education and years of practice experience have not been consistently found to relate to the level of moral reasoning in studies. One possible reason for inconsistent findings is that it is the learning from experience that changes the nurse's practice, not just the experience itself. Benner (1984) found that nurses evidenced differing clinical knowledge levels of novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient and expert. Other authors have identified additional competencies of the advanced practitioner (Hamric, 1989). Level of clinical knowledge was found in one study to be a more sensitive predictor of nurse activism in an ethical dilemma than either formal education or years of practice experience. An instrument developed to allow a nurse to self-report his/her clinical knowledge level will be described.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:05Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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