2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166290
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Values And Behavioral Intent In The NICU
Author(s):
Raines, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Raines, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: draines@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Ethical dilemmas arise in patient care situations when competing value-based considerations underlie the various approaches to caring for a patient. Values are standards that guide activities and are used as general plans to resolve conflicts and to make decisions. Values are internalized based on a set of attitudes and provide a schematic representation based on prior judgement of rightness or wrongness, motivated by personal sanctions, not external authority. For this instrument, values were conceptualized as consistent processes or enduring modes of conduct used as the foundation of what the individual nurse perceives to be important and influences the nurse's choice of behavior in patient care situations. In other words, values guide the type of information an individual seeks in a situation, that is perception of information is the mechanism to translate an individual's values into tangible facts, or the outward expression of values through attachment to specific objects, events, or behaviors, resulting in choice of action. Thus, an individual's choice of action emerges from the sequential interaction between the concept of values and information. The purpose of this instrument is to identify the values that guide the choices of neonatal nurses in their nursing practice and to identify the information believed to be important and the behavioral choices of nurses in specific patient care situations. The instrument is composed of two parts: a rating scale to identify individual values, and hypothetical patient care situations in the forms of vignettes to quantify the variables of information and choice. Values are operationalized as intercorrelation of attitude statements. Statements for the values scale [part I] were generated deductively from exemplars associated with the conceptual definition and inductively from prior qualitative studies. Scale items were reflective of the values reflected in the ANA Code for Nurses that is doing good, doing right and being just. Part II of the instrument consisted of patient care vignettes followed by two questions: the first question was a rating scale of the information available in the clinical setting and influential of nursing decisions, and the second question elicited the subject's degree of agreement or disagreement for each level of nursing/medical management classified on three levels: aggressive, limited/conservative or comfort, to avoid site-specific or regional differences. Items on all parts of the instrument are measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Once content validity was established using a panel of three experts, a convenience sample of 25 RNs in neonatal setting was enlisted for instrument testing. Each of the hypothesized sub-scales in part I and part II were independently entered into the principal components factor analysis, retaining only items with a factor loading of (> .40). Internal consistency measures of reliability for the sub-scales ranged from 0.62 to 0.89. Test-retest Pearson's Coefficient ranged from .75 to .79 for the three sub-scales resulting in an overall stability index of .86 for the value scale. The final instrument has been used in a nationwide survey of 330 neonatal nurses and an adaptation was used with a regional sample of pediatric nurses. These studies supported the psychometric properties of the instrument. Two qualitative studies have recently been complete with parents of neonates and pediatric patients to generate companion items for a parent version of the instrument.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValues And Behavioral Intent In The NICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRaines, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Raines, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: draines@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166290-
dc.description.abstractEthical dilemmas arise in patient care situations when competing value-based considerations underlie the various approaches to caring for a patient. Values are standards that guide activities and are used as general plans to resolve conflicts and to make decisions. Values are internalized based on a set of attitudes and provide a schematic representation based on prior judgement of rightness or wrongness, motivated by personal sanctions, not external authority. For this instrument, values were conceptualized as consistent processes or enduring modes of conduct used as the foundation of what the individual nurse perceives to be important and influences the nurse's choice of behavior in patient care situations. In other words, values guide the type of information an individual seeks in a situation, that is perception of information is the mechanism to translate an individual's values into tangible facts, or the outward expression of values through attachment to specific objects, events, or behaviors, resulting in choice of action. Thus, an individual's choice of action emerges from the sequential interaction between the concept of values and information. The purpose of this instrument is to identify the values that guide the choices of neonatal nurses in their nursing practice and to identify the information believed to be important and the behavioral choices of nurses in specific patient care situations. The instrument is composed of two parts: a rating scale to identify individual values, and hypothetical patient care situations in the forms of vignettes to quantify the variables of information and choice. Values are operationalized as intercorrelation of attitude statements. Statements for the values scale [part I] were generated deductively from exemplars associated with the conceptual definition and inductively from prior qualitative studies. Scale items were reflective of the values reflected in the ANA Code for Nurses that is doing good, doing right and being just. Part II of the instrument consisted of patient care vignettes followed by two questions: the first question was a rating scale of the information available in the clinical setting and influential of nursing decisions, and the second question elicited the subject's degree of agreement or disagreement for each level of nursing/medical management classified on three levels: aggressive, limited/conservative or comfort, to avoid site-specific or regional differences. Items on all parts of the instrument are measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Once content validity was established using a panel of three experts, a convenience sample of 25 RNs in neonatal setting was enlisted for instrument testing. Each of the hypothesized sub-scales in part I and part II were independently entered into the principal components factor analysis, retaining only items with a factor loading of (> .40). Internal consistency measures of reliability for the sub-scales ranged from 0.62 to 0.89. Test-retest Pearson's Coefficient ranged from .75 to .79 for the three sub-scales resulting in an overall stability index of .86 for the value scale. The final instrument has been used in a nationwide survey of 330 neonatal nurses and an adaptation was used with a regional sample of pediatric nurses. These studies supported the psychometric properties of the instrument. Two qualitative studies have recently been complete with parents of neonates and pediatric patients to generate companion items for a parent version of the instrument.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:08Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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