Multidisciplinary collaboration: Conceptual development and strategies for practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166292
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multidisciplinary collaboration: Conceptual development and strategies for practice
Author(s):
Patronis-Jones, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Patronis-Jones, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, email: rjones@falcon.tamucc.edu
Abstract:
A Participatory Action Research (PAR) study was designed to induce a conceptual definition of multidisciplinary collaboration and describe strategies to promote collaboration among several disciplines. The population consisted of approximately 346 licensed and non-licensed healh care personnel who might participate as members of a newly redesigned patient focused care unit. Under the umbrella of PAR a number of methods were used. Twenty-two focus groups comprised from a population of licensed and non-licensed health care personnel were interviewed using a framework of critical incidents, enhancers/facilitators, barriers/resistors and strategies identified through a literature review. The investigator as a participant observer attended planning meetings and other committee meetings where members from the population could be observed and field notes were taken. Related written documents were reviewed and field notes taken. Analyses of data transcriptions and field notes yielded themes in categories of the patient care process, communication, personality/attitude role and discipline, teamwork, and organizational structure and climate. Multidisciplinary collaboration was defined as a process involving team work or a partnership with clearly delineated roles. The process was further defined as communication by many disciplines, the patient, and family in planning and coordinating treatments for the attainment of mutually agreed upon patient care goals. Barriers/resistors included lack of communication, understanding roles, teamwork/support, resources, and familiarity with other health care providers. Certain personalities and attitudes and turf protection issues were also idnetified as barriers. Facilitators/enhancers were repetitive of the barrier/resistor themes. Strategies supported the same themes identified for barriers and enhancers. Using a combination of methods under the umbrella of participatory action research, vignettes were developed to measure levels of collaboration in future investigations. Strategies were identified that could be used to foster mutlidisciplinary collaboration in new and redesigned health care delivery settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultidisciplinary collaboration: Conceptual development and strategies for practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPatronis-Jones, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Patronis-Jones, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, email: rjones@falcon.tamucc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166292-
dc.description.abstractA Participatory Action Research (PAR) study was designed to induce a conceptual definition of multidisciplinary collaboration and describe strategies to promote collaboration among several disciplines. The population consisted of approximately 346 licensed and non-licensed healh care personnel who might participate as members of a newly redesigned patient focused care unit. Under the umbrella of PAR a number of methods were used. Twenty-two focus groups comprised from a population of licensed and non-licensed health care personnel were interviewed using a framework of critical incidents, enhancers/facilitators, barriers/resistors and strategies identified through a literature review. The investigator as a participant observer attended planning meetings and other committee meetings where members from the population could be observed and field notes were taken. Related written documents were reviewed and field notes taken. Analyses of data transcriptions and field notes yielded themes in categories of the patient care process, communication, personality/attitude role and discipline, teamwork, and organizational structure and climate. Multidisciplinary collaboration was defined as a process involving team work or a partnership with clearly delineated roles. The process was further defined as communication by many disciplines, the patient, and family in planning and coordinating treatments for the attainment of mutually agreed upon patient care goals. Barriers/resistors included lack of communication, understanding roles, teamwork/support, resources, and familiarity with other health care providers. Certain personalities and attitudes and turf protection issues were also idnetified as barriers. Facilitators/enhancers were repetitive of the barrier/resistor themes. Strategies supported the same themes identified for barriers and enhancers. Using a combination of methods under the umbrella of participatory action research, vignettes were developed to measure levels of collaboration in future investigations. Strategies were identified that could be used to foster mutlidisciplinary collaboration in new and redesigned health care delivery settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:10Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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