2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166293
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reconstructing A Life: A Nursing Study of Long Term Survivors of AIDS (DISS)
Author(s):
Barroso, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.edu
Abstract:
This study describes the meaning of and dimensions involved in being a long term survivor of AIDS. Research goals included determining the psychosocial factors that enable people with HIV infection to become long term survivors of AIDS and describing the mechanism by which these factors worked. A naturalistic study design using ethnographic interviewing techniques was employed. The sensitizing concepts for the study were health and coping; health was chosen because long term survivors of AIDS have achieved some level of health within the context of their illness, and coping was chosen because it was important to determine how these individuals dealt with their illness. Theoretical and snowball sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included being at least 18 years old and English speaking; being in Stage IV of HIV disease (using the 1987 CDC criteria) for at least three years; and self-definition as a long term survivor. The study group consisted of 20 participants: 14 men and six women; 18 were Caucasian and two were African-American. Data were generated through multiple intensive open-ended interviews, demographic information sheets, and self-reporting of T4 levels. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques. The major process, reconstructing one's life, was inducted from the data. This process was supported by five dimensions: normalizing, focusing on living, taking care of oneself, being in relation to others, and triumphing. The dimensions contained components which were the specific mechanisms used to cope with AIDS. These dimensions and their components worked by helping the participants maintain a life in balance. The results of this study have implications for counseling people when diagnosed as HIV positive, and for nursing actions to promote health and hope among people in various stages of HIV disease.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReconstructing A Life: A Nursing Study of Long Term Survivors of AIDS (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166293-
dc.description.abstractThis study describes the meaning of and dimensions involved in being a long term survivor of AIDS. Research goals included determining the psychosocial factors that enable people with HIV infection to become long term survivors of AIDS and describing the mechanism by which these factors worked. A naturalistic study design using ethnographic interviewing techniques was employed. The sensitizing concepts for the study were health and coping; health was chosen because long term survivors of AIDS have achieved some level of health within the context of their illness, and coping was chosen because it was important to determine how these individuals dealt with their illness. Theoretical and snowball sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included being at least 18 years old and English speaking; being in Stage IV of HIV disease (using the 1987 CDC criteria) for at least three years; and self-definition as a long term survivor. The study group consisted of 20 participants: 14 men and six women; 18 were Caucasian and two were African-American. Data were generated through multiple intensive open-ended interviews, demographic information sheets, and self-reporting of T4 levels. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques. The major process, reconstructing one's life, was inducted from the data. This process was supported by five dimensions: normalizing, focusing on living, taking care of oneself, being in relation to others, and triumphing. The dimensions contained components which were the specific mechanisms used to cope with AIDS. These dimensions and their components worked by helping the participants maintain a life in balance. The results of this study have implications for counseling people when diagnosed as HIV positive, and for nursing actions to promote health and hope among people in various stages of HIV disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:11Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.