2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166300
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examination of the Nursing Minimum Data Set
Author(s):
Tillman, Harry
Author Details:
Harry Tillman, PhD, Commander, Nurse Corps, U.S. Navy, Head, Nursing Research, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: tillmahj@evms.edu
Abstract:
Clinical nursing data have not been a useful source for research because they have not been collected consistently, and their reliability and validity have not been demonstrated. The Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) has been proposed as a mechanism for gathering, identifying and coding data about nursing practice across settings. The sixteen elements of the NMDS, if consistently collected and utilized, could provide information about (a) nursing practice, (b) trends in health care delivery, and (c) allocation of scarce health care resources. Ultimately, the NMDS would have wide practice, administrative, and research implications, by documenting the specific nursing actions/interventions nurses perform, and the associated outcomesof these actions. This is crucial to demonstrating the contribution of nursing to health care delivery, separate and distinct from the contributions of other health care providers. The purposes of this study are to examine the availability of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) elements in a large urban medical center and to determine how reliably the data elements can be coded according to the NANDA taxonomy and the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC). A descriptive, methodologic design will be used to examine the availability and reliability of the NMDS elements abstracted from 93 health records, randomly selected from the 20,000 medical-surgical admissions during 1995. Interater and intrarater reliability will be reported using four metrics: (a) percentage ofagreement, (b) coefficient Kappa (Cohen, 1960) for categorical data with fewer than ten possible coding categories, (c) tetrachoric correlations, and (d) Pearson's product moment correlation for interval data, when appropriate.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamination of the Nursing Minimum Data Seten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTillman, Harryen_US
dc.author.detailsHarry Tillman, PhD, Commander, Nurse Corps, U.S. Navy, Head, Nursing Research, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: tillmahj@evms.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166300-
dc.description.abstractClinical nursing data have not been a useful source for research because they have not been collected consistently, and their reliability and validity have not been demonstrated. The Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) has been proposed as a mechanism for gathering, identifying and coding data about nursing practice across settings. The sixteen elements of the NMDS, if consistently collected and utilized, could provide information about (a) nursing practice, (b) trends in health care delivery, and (c) allocation of scarce health care resources. Ultimately, the NMDS would have wide practice, administrative, and research implications, by documenting the specific nursing actions/interventions nurses perform, and the associated outcomesof these actions. This is crucial to demonstrating the contribution of nursing to health care delivery, separate and distinct from the contributions of other health care providers. The purposes of this study are to examine the availability of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) elements in a large urban medical center and to determine how reliably the data elements can be coded according to the NANDA taxonomy and the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC). A descriptive, methodologic design will be used to examine the availability and reliability of the NMDS elements abstracted from 93 health records, randomly selected from the 20,000 medical-surgical admissions during 1995. Interater and intrarater reliability will be reported using four metrics: (a) percentage ofagreement, (b) coefficient Kappa (Cohen, 1960) for categorical data with fewer than ten possible coding categories, (c) tetrachoric correlations, and (d) Pearson's product moment correlation for interval data, when appropriate.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:20Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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