Adult black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risk health behaviors as adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166301
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adult black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risk health behaviors as adolescents
Author(s):
Rivers, Rose
Author Details:
Rose Rivers, PhD, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: riverrm.nrsng@shands.ufl.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe adult Black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. Risky health behavior was defined as any act which had the potential to negatively effect an individual's overall well-being. The research question was, what are the perceived factors associated with Black males' participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents? A phenomenological approach using focus group technique was used to ascertain participants' opinions about factors associated with Black males' participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. A purposive sampling of Black males with a history of participation in risky health behaviors was selected. A content analysis was done which delineated categories and themes and provided an exhaustive description of Black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. The results of this research demonstrated six major themes: desire for autonomy and equality, freedom, respect and recognition, love, success, and belonging. However the capability to achieve their desires were hindered by fear of self-responsibility, letting go of the past, isolation, rejection, failure, and trusting. Participants articulated their desires by explaining what they wanted or needed but did not receive as adolescents and in some cases they had not had their needs met currently as young adults. As participants articulated their desires, they concurrently expressed related fears. The unresolved conflicts between driving forces (desires) and constraining forces (fears) caused internal struggles polarizing the participants and in some cases rendering them incapable of acting proactively in their own behalf. Participants identified 4 major intervention categories to facilitate positive health outcomes for Black male adolescents. The categories are meaningful incentives, empowered Black males, leaders/role models, and community support. Given that psychosocial variables were driving participants' alternatives, a transformation that will shape the way health care is provided for Black males is required to focus on prevention of illness and social well being. Although education programs must emphasize prevention and self-responsibility, it is imperative to build in strategies that will have meaning for Black males. Cultural values must be incorporated as Black males are more likely to follow a health promotion plan which takes into consideration their beliefs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdult black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risk health behaviors as adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRivers, Roseen_US
dc.author.detailsRose Rivers, PhD, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: riverrm.nrsng@shands.ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166301-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe adult Black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. Risky health behavior was defined as any act which had the potential to negatively effect an individual's overall well-being. The research question was, what are the perceived factors associated with Black males' participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents? A phenomenological approach using focus group technique was used to ascertain participants' opinions about factors associated with Black males' participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. A purposive sampling of Black males with a history of participation in risky health behaviors was selected. A content analysis was done which delineated categories and themes and provided an exhaustive description of Black males' perceptions of factors associated with their participation in risky health behaviors as adolescents. The results of this research demonstrated six major themes: desire for autonomy and equality, freedom, respect and recognition, love, success, and belonging. However the capability to achieve their desires were hindered by fear of self-responsibility, letting go of the past, isolation, rejection, failure, and trusting. Participants articulated their desires by explaining what they wanted or needed but did not receive as adolescents and in some cases they had not had their needs met currently as young adults. As participants articulated their desires, they concurrently expressed related fears. The unresolved conflicts between driving forces (desires) and constraining forces (fears) caused internal struggles polarizing the participants and in some cases rendering them incapable of acting proactively in their own behalf. Participants identified 4 major intervention categories to facilitate positive health outcomes for Black male adolescents. The categories are meaningful incentives, empowered Black males, leaders/role models, and community support. Given that psychosocial variables were driving participants' alternatives, a transformation that will shape the way health care is provided for Black males is required to focus on prevention of illness and social well being. Although education programs must emphasize prevention and self-responsibility, it is imperative to build in strategies that will have meaning for Black males. Cultural values must be incorporated as Black males are more likely to follow a health promotion plan which takes into consideration their beliefs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:21Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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