Emergency Room Nurses' Perceptions of Nurse Caring BehaviorsTowards Male and Female Clients with Chest Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166308
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Room Nurses' Perceptions of Nurse Caring BehaviorsTowards Male and Female Clients with Chest Pain
Author(s):
Guerrero, Alberto
Author Details:
Alberto Guerrero, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Florida International University, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: alberto.guerrero4@fiu.edu
Abstract:
The objective of this study was to identify nurses' perceptions of nurse caring behaviors towards male and female clients with chest pain and to identify differences in nurses' perceptions of caring behaviors towards male and female with chest pain. The researcher conducted a descriptive and correlation study in nine emergency rooms and six detention centers throughout the southeastern United States. The convenient sample used consisted of two hundred nurses, currently working in an emergency room setting from April through September 1995. Power analysis indicated an effect size (gamma) of 0.20, Power (1-beta) of 0.80, Significant level (alpha) of < 0.05. The instrument used to rank caring behaviors was Larson's nurse caring behaviors (CARE-Q). It ranked fifty caring behaviors along a continuum of significance from "most important" to "least important." A forced choice solution required the participant to conform to symmetrical, quasi-normal, distribution ranging from one through seven. The researcher obtained the means for each caring behavior by dividing each caring behavior sum's total by 200 (n=200). The caring behaviors perceived as most indicative of caring by the nurse were: Monitoring the client, introducing yourself, explaining all procedures, test, and treatments, asking the client questions, and listening to the client. The least important caring behaviors perceived by the nurse were: Volunteer to do little things, nurse is cheerful, professional in appearance, suggest questions to ask the doctor, and anticipates needs to transfer patient. The study also showed no significant difference in perceptions between male and female client with chest pain. This study's theoretical implications provides continued development toward the concept of caring by identifying which caring behaviors nurses perceive as most important and least important. Practical implications suggest that nurses will: Maintain a high level of competency by attending nursing seminars, client teaching, and provide the same caring behaviors toward a male and female client with chest pain. Limitation of the study were: A low survey response rate of 38%, subjects were recruited by convenience sample, and potential response bias between case studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Room Nurses' Perceptions of Nurse Caring BehaviorsTowards Male and Female Clients with Chest Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuerrero, Albertoen_US
dc.author.detailsAlberto Guerrero, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Florida International University, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: alberto.guerrero4@fiu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166308-
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to identify nurses' perceptions of nurse caring behaviors towards male and female clients with chest pain and to identify differences in nurses' perceptions of caring behaviors towards male and female with chest pain. The researcher conducted a descriptive and correlation study in nine emergency rooms and six detention centers throughout the southeastern United States. The convenient sample used consisted of two hundred nurses, currently working in an emergency room setting from April through September 1995. Power analysis indicated an effect size (gamma) of 0.20, Power (1-beta) of 0.80, Significant level (alpha) of < 0.05. The instrument used to rank caring behaviors was Larson's nurse caring behaviors (CARE-Q). It ranked fifty caring behaviors along a continuum of significance from "most important" to "least important." A forced choice solution required the participant to conform to symmetrical, quasi-normal, distribution ranging from one through seven. The researcher obtained the means for each caring behavior by dividing each caring behavior sum's total by 200 (n=200). The caring behaviors perceived as most indicative of caring by the nurse were: Monitoring the client, introducing yourself, explaining all procedures, test, and treatments, asking the client questions, and listening to the client. The least important caring behaviors perceived by the nurse were: Volunteer to do little things, nurse is cheerful, professional in appearance, suggest questions to ask the doctor, and anticipates needs to transfer patient. The study also showed no significant difference in perceptions between male and female client with chest pain. This study's theoretical implications provides continued development toward the concept of caring by identifying which caring behaviors nurses perceive as most important and least important. Practical implications suggest that nurses will: Maintain a high level of competency by attending nursing seminars, client teaching, and provide the same caring behaviors toward a male and female client with chest pain. Limitation of the study were: A low survey response rate of 38%, subjects were recruited by convenience sample, and potential response bias between case studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:30Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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