2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166310
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Analysis of the Religion Construct in an AppalachianPopulation
Author(s):
Simpson, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Simpson, MSN, Associate Professor, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, (updated February 2015) email: MarySimpson@upike.edu
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to examine the psychometric properties of selected Dimensions of Religion (DR) (King & Hunt, 1975) and the Intrinsic Religious Motivation Scale (IRMS) (Hoge, 1972) in a healthy Appalachian population and to analyze the cultural relevancy of the measures. In the nursing literature, the concept of religion has been subsumed under the broader concept of spirituality. However, the phenomena of religion in health care and its relationship to spirituality requires further clarification for nursing research. Appalachian mountain religion is viewed as a regional religious tradition with distinct beliefs, worship practices, religious experiences, and church traditions (McCauley, 1995). The nature of that religious system can potentially influence the Appalachian client's interactions with health care personnel and subsequent health care outcomes. Three of King and Hunt's Dimensions of Religion (DR) were chosen for this study -- Creedal Assent, Devotionalism, and Congregational Involvement. Hoge's IRMS was designed to measure the extent to which people find that their primary motive is religion. The DR and IRMS measures were tested for internal consistency reliability, construct and criterion-related validity in a convenience sample of 37 associate degree nursing students at a community college in southern West Virginia. After testing, qualitative comments on the measures were elicited from the sample in order to evaluate content validity. The DR subscales and IRMS demonstrated good internal consistency reliability as measured by Cronbach's alpha. However, item analysis suggested certain items as candidates for deletion based on low item-total correlations and qualitative comments about bias. Validity of a general religion construct underlying the DR measures was sported by intercorrelations between the subscales. Low intercorrelations between Creedal Assent and the two subscales sported that a distinct dimension of religion was being measured. Moderate intercorrelations between Devotionalism and Congregational Involvement did not support the measure of distinct constructs. Concurrent, criterion-validity was supported by a significant correlation between the IRMS and Devotionalism subscale, both of which purport to measure the informal aspects of religion. The use of private prayer as a criterion measure related significantly to IRMS scores. King and Hunt's DR measures were normed twenty years ago in mainline, Christian populations and historical and cultural relevancy must be addressed. Congregational Involvement subscale items were found to be biased in this sample because of a cultural emphasis on belief and faith rather than hierarchial structure. The study demonstrated that Creedal Assent and IRMS are reliable and valid for use with healthy Appalachian adults. Awareness of a client's religious beliefs and intrinsic religious motivation can provide research direction in the care of those clients who turn to religion during illness or other stressful events.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Analysis of the Religion Construct in an AppalachianPopulationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Simpson, MSN, Associate Professor, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, (updated February 2015) email: MarySimpson@upike.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166310-
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to examine the psychometric properties of selected Dimensions of Religion (DR) (King & Hunt, 1975) and the Intrinsic Religious Motivation Scale (IRMS) (Hoge, 1972) in a healthy Appalachian population and to analyze the cultural relevancy of the measures. In the nursing literature, the concept of religion has been subsumed under the broader concept of spirituality. However, the phenomena of religion in health care and its relationship to spirituality requires further clarification for nursing research. Appalachian mountain religion is viewed as a regional religious tradition with distinct beliefs, worship practices, religious experiences, and church traditions (McCauley, 1995). The nature of that religious system can potentially influence the Appalachian client's interactions with health care personnel and subsequent health care outcomes. Three of King and Hunt's Dimensions of Religion (DR) were chosen for this study -- Creedal Assent, Devotionalism, and Congregational Involvement. Hoge's IRMS was designed to measure the extent to which people find that their primary motive is religion. The DR and IRMS measures were tested for internal consistency reliability, construct and criterion-related validity in a convenience sample of 37 associate degree nursing students at a community college in southern West Virginia. After testing, qualitative comments on the measures were elicited from the sample in order to evaluate content validity. The DR subscales and IRMS demonstrated good internal consistency reliability as measured by Cronbach's alpha. However, item analysis suggested certain items as candidates for deletion based on low item-total correlations and qualitative comments about bias. Validity of a general religion construct underlying the DR measures was sported by intercorrelations between the subscales. Low intercorrelations between Creedal Assent and the two subscales sported that a distinct dimension of religion was being measured. Moderate intercorrelations between Devotionalism and Congregational Involvement did not support the measure of distinct constructs. Concurrent, criterion-validity was supported by a significant correlation between the IRMS and Devotionalism subscale, both of which purport to measure the informal aspects of religion. The use of private prayer as a criterion measure related significantly to IRMS scores. King and Hunt's DR measures were normed twenty years ago in mainline, Christian populations and historical and cultural relevancy must be addressed. Congregational Involvement subscale items were found to be biased in this sample because of a cultural emphasis on belief and faith rather than hierarchial structure. The study demonstrated that Creedal Assent and IRMS are reliable and valid for use with healthy Appalachian adults. Awareness of a client's religious beliefs and intrinsic religious motivation can provide research direction in the care of those clients who turn to religion during illness or other stressful events.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:32Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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