2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166311
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Submaximal Exercise of the Pelvic Floor (DISS)
Author(s):
Johnson, Vicki
Author Details:
Vicki Johnson, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USA, email: sonvyj@ttuhsc.edu
Abstract:
Urinary incontinence is a threat to physical and emotional wellness, a social stigma often leading to loss of independence, and a significant source of spiraling costs in the already burdened health care system. The involuntary loss of urine during increased intro-abdominal pressure, genuine stress urinary incontinence (SUI), is the result of a weakening of the pelvic floor musculature resulting in an inability to maintain effective contraction of these muscles. This is the most common form of continence, found predominantly in women. Previous studies have used maximal voluntary contracts (MVC) in order to induce hypertrophy of the circumvaginal musculature (CVM) and increase CVM strength. However, most women can interrupt urine flow on demand, indicating adequate CVM strength, but cannot prevent long term leakage, implicating a deficiency of endurance of the CVM. It is hypothesized then, that the use of a SVC exercise protocol will be more effective than a NMVC in reconditioning the muscles of the pelvic floor to increase endurance and facilitate sustained contraction during episodes of increased intra-abdominal pressure. It is further hypothesized that incontinence episodes and/or amount of leakage during these episodes will be decreased as a result of increased muscle endurance in the CVM of women with SUI. This study will compare the effects of a SVC exercise protocol to those of a NMVC exercise protocol for reconditioning the CVM in women with SUI. Specifically, this study will test the relative efficacy of two exercise protocols on training-induced changes in (a) endurance; (b) muscle strength and recruitment of muscle activity during voluntary contractions and (c) improvement of continence related to training-induced changes in endurance and/or strength. The sample will consist of 30 women with SUI. Training-induced changes will be measured using the perineal reeducation system, vaginal pressure probes, and perianal surface electrodes. Occurrence of incontinent episodes/perceived urine leakage will be documented from self-report diaries. Actual urine loss will be compared from pre and post protocol weighed ten-hour pad tests. Descriptive statistics will be used to analyze demographic characteristics, obtain a profile of the sample, and determine comparability of the two groups. Changes in endurance for individual subjects in both groups as well as differences between the means of both groups will be tested by a two-way analysis of variance. Changes in muscle strength, decreases in episodes of urine leakage and amount of leakage will be tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. In all tests, a p < 0.05 will be accepted as significant. This research will facilitate development of clinical nursing interventions specific to type of urinary incontinence, rationale for the individualization of treatment protocols and provide information to further develop a program of research in urologic nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Submaximal Exercise of the Pelvic Floor (DISS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Vickien_US
dc.author.detailsVicki Johnson, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USA, email: sonvyj@ttuhsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166311-
dc.description.abstractUrinary incontinence is a threat to physical and emotional wellness, a social stigma often leading to loss of independence, and a significant source of spiraling costs in the already burdened health care system. The involuntary loss of urine during increased intro-abdominal pressure, genuine stress urinary incontinence (SUI), is the result of a weakening of the pelvic floor musculature resulting in an inability to maintain effective contraction of these muscles. This is the most common form of continence, found predominantly in women. Previous studies have used maximal voluntary contracts (MVC) in order to induce hypertrophy of the circumvaginal musculature (CVM) and increase CVM strength. However, most women can interrupt urine flow on demand, indicating adequate CVM strength, but cannot prevent long term leakage, implicating a deficiency of endurance of the CVM. It is hypothesized then, that the use of a SVC exercise protocol will be more effective than a NMVC in reconditioning the muscles of the pelvic floor to increase endurance and facilitate sustained contraction during episodes of increased intra-abdominal pressure. It is further hypothesized that incontinence episodes and/or amount of leakage during these episodes will be decreased as a result of increased muscle endurance in the CVM of women with SUI. This study will compare the effects of a SVC exercise protocol to those of a NMVC exercise protocol for reconditioning the CVM in women with SUI. Specifically, this study will test the relative efficacy of two exercise protocols on training-induced changes in (a) endurance; (b) muscle strength and recruitment of muscle activity during voluntary contractions and (c) improvement of continence related to training-induced changes in endurance and/or strength. The sample will consist of 30 women with SUI. Training-induced changes will be measured using the perineal reeducation system, vaginal pressure probes, and perianal surface electrodes. Occurrence of incontinent episodes/perceived urine leakage will be documented from self-report diaries. Actual urine loss will be compared from pre and post protocol weighed ten-hour pad tests. Descriptive statistics will be used to analyze demographic characteristics, obtain a profile of the sample, and determine comparability of the two groups. Changes in endurance for individual subjects in both groups as well as differences between the means of both groups will be tested by a two-way analysis of variance. Changes in muscle strength, decreases in episodes of urine leakage and amount of leakage will be tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. In all tests, a p < 0.05 will be accepted as significant. This research will facilitate development of clinical nursing interventions specific to type of urinary incontinence, rationale for the individualization of treatment protocols and provide information to further develop a program of research in urologic nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:34Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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