2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166316
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Foot Massage in Cancer Pain
Author(s):
Stephenson, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Stephenson, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: stephensonn@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Nationwide, there is a large number of cancer patients both at home and in institutions experiencing moderate to severe pain without adequate relief. Although much has been written in the last decade concerning pharmacological interventions for pain relief, less research is in the literature about nonpharmacological interventions. The hypothesis for this study is: There will be a greater decrease in cancer pain following foot massage in a group of adult cancer patients in comparison to a group of adult cancer patients with no foot massage. This quasi-experimental research will use the Visual Analogue Scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire to measure the difference in cancer pain in adults before and after foot massage. In a rural outpatient clinic, oncology chemotherapy patients experiencing pain will be purposively selected. Systematic random sampling will be used; the first patient will be in the intervention group and every second patient will be in the control group. Pain will be measured 2 times (before foot massage and 30 minutes following foot massage) during two clinic days. The intervention will consist of a 30 minute foot massage, specifically reflexology. The control group will be given a pretest and a posttest 1 hour later. A paired t test will be used to analyze the data. Results from this study will assist cancer patients (experiencing pain) throughout the country. This non-pharmacological intervention is cost-effective and can be used by the patients, their families, and health care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFoot Massage in Cancer Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Stephenson, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: stephensonn@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166316-
dc.description.abstractNationwide, there is a large number of cancer patients both at home and in institutions experiencing moderate to severe pain without adequate relief. Although much has been written in the last decade concerning pharmacological interventions for pain relief, less research is in the literature about nonpharmacological interventions. The hypothesis for this study is: There will be a greater decrease in cancer pain following foot massage in a group of adult cancer patients in comparison to a group of adult cancer patients with no foot massage. This quasi-experimental research will use the Visual Analogue Scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire to measure the difference in cancer pain in adults before and after foot massage. In a rural outpatient clinic, oncology chemotherapy patients experiencing pain will be purposively selected. Systematic random sampling will be used; the first patient will be in the intervention group and every second patient will be in the control group. Pain will be measured 2 times (before foot massage and 30 minutes following foot massage) during two clinic days. The intervention will consist of a 30 minute foot massage, specifically reflexology. The control group will be given a pretest and a posttest 1 hour later. A paired t test will be used to analyze the data. Results from this study will assist cancer patients (experiencing pain) throughout the country. This non-pharmacological intervention is cost-effective and can be used by the patients, their families, and health care providers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:41Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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