2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166324
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Type Preferences and Coping Skills
Author(s):
Moore, Penny
Author Details:
Penny Moore, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Harris College of Nursing Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: penny.moore@tcu.edu
Abstract:
Aim: to identify any relationships that may exist between an individual's type preferences (as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and the coping strategies they use (as measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire). Research question: are there a relationships between an individual's type preference and the coping strategies most frequently used? Sujects/participants: individuals age 60 years and greater, N=30. Methods: data will be collected through two instruments administered to each study participant Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire. This will be done through mail in packets so participants may complete the instruments in the privacy of their own homes. The Kruskal-Wallis 1-Way Anova, Chi-Square significance, and Crosstabs tables will be used to analysis and present the data. Findings and Implications: this study is in progress and only the pilot will be presented. If a high correlation exists between type preference and coping strategies this could have major implications for health education. Efforts in stress management, retirement planning, and crises intervention with the elderly are just a few areas that could benefit from this information.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleType Preferences and Coping Skillsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Pennyen_US
dc.author.detailsPenny Moore, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Harris College of Nursing Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: penny.moore@tcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166324-
dc.description.abstractAim: to identify any relationships that may exist between an individual's type preferences (as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and the coping strategies they use (as measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire). Research question: are there a relationships between an individual's type preference and the coping strategies most frequently used? Sujects/participants: individuals age 60 years and greater, N=30. Methods: data will be collected through two instruments administered to each study participant Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire. This will be done through mail in packets so participants may complete the instruments in the privacy of their own homes. The Kruskal-Wallis 1-Way Anova, Chi-Square significance, and Crosstabs tables will be used to analysis and present the data. Findings and Implications: this study is in progress and only the pilot will be presented. If a high correlation exists between type preference and coping strategies this could have major implications for health education. Efforts in stress management, retirement planning, and crises intervention with the elderly are just a few areas that could benefit from this information.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:50Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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