A developmental education program model for high-risk minority baccalaureate nursing students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166329
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A developmental education program model for high-risk minority baccalaureate nursing students
Author(s):
Krimsley, Valerie
Author Details:
Valerie Krimsley, EdD, Assistant Professor, Florida International University School of Nursing, North Miami, Florida, USA, (updated February 2015) email: vbrowne@mdc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define a Developmental Education Program Model for high-risk minority baccalaureate nursing students based upon perceived needs determined by nursing students and nursing faculty. Significance for Nursing Education: The underrepresentation of minority nurses has been a long-standing problem in the field of nursing. The difficulties faced by minority students occur at both ends of the spectrum, entering baccalaureate programs of nursing and completing them. This model should help nursing schools in developing programs to assist high-risk minority students to obtain the academic skills and psycho-social-motivational attributes necessary to succeed in a baccalaureate school of nursing. Framework: The framework was derived from the Developmental Education Literature. Method: Design-A qualitative design with selected quantitative methods was used. This method was selected to allow for the discovery and exploration of experiences and/or problems from within the context of minority baccalaureate nursing students and faculty. Sample-The sample consisted of 3 Florida baccalaureate programs of nursing from the state university system. Purposeful sampling was the strategy used to identify informants. A total of 15 baccalaureate nursing students and nine nursing faculty members were interviewed. A total of 113 students and 52 faculty members completed the questionnaire. Instrument-Instrumentation for the research study consisted of the humane instrument, interview schedule and questionnaire. Data Analysis: The statistical data analysis used for the Likert-Scaled questionnaire was chi-square to examine significant differences in the responses of faculty and students; and, analysis of variance to examine for significant differences between the responses of faculty and students at the three universities. Data gathered was divided into four categories: academic, financial, psycho-social and personal. Interview data was grouped into the same categories and examined for themes which emerged. Conclusions/Implications for Nursing Education: The concept of the Developmental Education Program Model is rooted in the purpose, philosophy, and needs. The purpose of the Developmental Education Program Model is to contribute to the growth of its students. To fulfill this purpose, the program must be seen as a integral part of the nursing program which students may access before entering the nursing program and continuing to utilize her graduation. The faculty involved in the Developmental Education Program initiatives must believe and be committed to the program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA developmental education program model for high-risk minority baccalaureate nursing studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrimsley, Valerieen_US
dc.author.detailsValerie Krimsley, EdD, Assistant Professor, Florida International University School of Nursing, North Miami, Florida, USA, (updated February 2015) email: vbrowne@mdc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166329-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to define a Developmental Education Program Model for high-risk minority baccalaureate nursing students based upon perceived needs determined by nursing students and nursing faculty. Significance for Nursing Education: The underrepresentation of minority nurses has been a long-standing problem in the field of nursing. The difficulties faced by minority students occur at both ends of the spectrum, entering baccalaureate programs of nursing and completing them. This model should help nursing schools in developing programs to assist high-risk minority students to obtain the academic skills and psycho-social-motivational attributes necessary to succeed in a baccalaureate school of nursing. Framework: The framework was derived from the Developmental Education Literature. Method: Design-A qualitative design with selected quantitative methods was used. This method was selected to allow for the discovery and exploration of experiences and/or problems from within the context of minority baccalaureate nursing students and faculty. Sample-The sample consisted of 3 Florida baccalaureate programs of nursing from the state university system. Purposeful sampling was the strategy used to identify informants. A total of 15 baccalaureate nursing students and nine nursing faculty members were interviewed. A total of 113 students and 52 faculty members completed the questionnaire. Instrument-Instrumentation for the research study consisted of the humane instrument, interview schedule and questionnaire. Data Analysis: The statistical data analysis used for the Likert-Scaled questionnaire was chi-square to examine significant differences in the responses of faculty and students; and, analysis of variance to examine for significant differences between the responses of faculty and students at the three universities. Data gathered was divided into four categories: academic, financial, psycho-social and personal. Interview data was grouped into the same categories and examined for themes which emerged. Conclusions/Implications for Nursing Education: The concept of the Developmental Education Program Model is rooted in the purpose, philosophy, and needs. The purpose of the Developmental Education Program Model is to contribute to the growth of its students. To fulfill this purpose, the program must be seen as a integral part of the nursing program which students may access before entering the nursing program and continuing to utilize her graduation. The faculty involved in the Developmental Education Program initiatives must believe and be committed to the program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:56Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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