Relationship between spiritual perspective, depression and well-being among family members of hospitalized critically ill and nonhospitalized healthy adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166330
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between spiritual perspective, depression and well-being among family members of hospitalized critically ill and nonhospitalized healthy adults
Author(s):
Kaye, Judy
Author Details:
Judy Kaye, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: judy.kaye@sc.edu
Abstract:
The Family Resiliency Stress Model suggests a number of variables affect ability to cope with stress. Having a family member admitted to the critical care area is an unexpected stressful event. Spiritual perspectives may be able to neutralize the uncontrollable stress and depression family members of the critically ill experience. The biological and psychosocial losses associated with critical illness may render families more open to spirituality as a way to maintain well-being and decrease depression. The purpose of this study is to compare the relationships of spirituality to well-being and depression among family members of critically ill adults and nonhospitalized healthy adults. Methodology: This study compares two groups of adults matched on four demographic variables: age, education, gender, and religious background. The two groups were selected from the southeastern U.S. and were comprised of family members of hospitalized critically ill adults (n=100) and healthy adults not dealing with critical illness (n=97). Hypotheses predicted that 1) controlling for age, education, gender, and religious background, depression will be negatively related to spirituality; 2) controlling for age, education, gender and religious background, perceptions of well-being will be positively related to spirituality; 3) the relationships between depression and spirituality, and between perceptions of well-being and spirituality will be stronger among family members of critically ill patients than among adults not dealing with critical illness. Three instruments were administered: Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and Index of Well-Being (IWB). Findings: Data were analyzed using descriptive and multivariant statistics. Results indicate that after controlling for the demographic variables, depression was not related significantly to spirituality (p=<.612) among the combined samples. However, after controlling for the demographic variables, perceptions of well-being were positively related to spirituality (p= .005). The relationship between depression and spirituality, and between perceptions of well-being and spirituality were somewhat stronger among family members of critically ill patients. Still the correlation differences, when compared to the correlations among healthy adults, were not statistically significant. Conclusions: A significant relationship between spirituality and depression does not exist among family members of hospitalized critically ill adults and healthy adults. However, the relationship between depression and spirituality was stronger among the family members of critically ill adults compared to the healthy adults not dealing with a critical illness. A significant relationship does exist between spirituality and perceptions of well-being among hospitalized critically ill adults. Although the relationship of spirituality and perceptions of well-being were high among both groups, these relationships were stronger among family members dealing with a critical illness. Recommendations: Spirituality may be a useful resource to aid in coping and strengthen perceptions of well-being for family members of critically ill patients. Therefore, nurses should incorporate into their care planning the use of spirituality to enhance coping and well-being. Further research is needed to explore methodologies to utilizing spirituality as an intervention to enhance well-being and coping.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between spiritual perspective, depression and well-being among family members of hospitalized critically ill and nonhospitalized healthy adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKaye, Judyen_US
dc.author.detailsJudy Kaye, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: judy.kaye@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166330-
dc.description.abstractThe Family Resiliency Stress Model suggests a number of variables affect ability to cope with stress. Having a family member admitted to the critical care area is an unexpected stressful event. Spiritual perspectives may be able to neutralize the uncontrollable stress and depression family members of the critically ill experience. The biological and psychosocial losses associated with critical illness may render families more open to spirituality as a way to maintain well-being and decrease depression. The purpose of this study is to compare the relationships of spirituality to well-being and depression among family members of critically ill adults and nonhospitalized healthy adults. Methodology: This study compares two groups of adults matched on four demographic variables: age, education, gender, and religious background. The two groups were selected from the southeastern U.S. and were comprised of family members of hospitalized critically ill adults (n=100) and healthy adults not dealing with critical illness (n=97). Hypotheses predicted that 1) controlling for age, education, gender, and religious background, depression will be negatively related to spirituality; 2) controlling for age, education, gender and religious background, perceptions of well-being will be positively related to spirituality; 3) the relationships between depression and spirituality, and between perceptions of well-being and spirituality will be stronger among family members of critically ill patients than among adults not dealing with critical illness. Three instruments were administered: Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and Index of Well-Being (IWB). Findings: Data were analyzed using descriptive and multivariant statistics. Results indicate that after controlling for the demographic variables, depression was not related significantly to spirituality (p=<.612) among the combined samples. However, after controlling for the demographic variables, perceptions of well-being were positively related to spirituality (p= .005). The relationship between depression and spirituality, and between perceptions of well-being and spirituality were somewhat stronger among family members of critically ill patients. Still the correlation differences, when compared to the correlations among healthy adults, were not statistically significant. Conclusions: A significant relationship between spirituality and depression does not exist among family members of hospitalized critically ill adults and healthy adults. However, the relationship between depression and spirituality was stronger among the family members of critically ill adults compared to the healthy adults not dealing with a critical illness. A significant relationship does exist between spirituality and perceptions of well-being among hospitalized critically ill adults. Although the relationship of spirituality and perceptions of well-being were high among both groups, these relationships were stronger among family members dealing with a critical illness. Recommendations: Spirituality may be a useful resource to aid in coping and strengthen perceptions of well-being for family members of critically ill patients. Therefore, nurses should incorporate into their care planning the use of spirituality to enhance coping and well-being. Further research is needed to explore methodologies to utilizing spirituality as an intervention to enhance well-being and coping.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:44:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:44:57Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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