Self-Esteem and Well-Being Among Women with Breast Cancer and Age-Matched Comparison Women

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166332
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Esteem and Well-Being Among Women with Breast Cancer and Age-Matched Comparison Women
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Women with breast cancer can experience significant, irreversible changes in the self that can affect their self-esteem and well-being. Although researchers typically focus on breast cancer's potential to negatively affect self-esteem, theory and research suggest that some women are able to experience positive changes in the self following diagnosis of cancer. Such positive changes in the self may improve self-esteem and subsequently improve well-being. The purposes of this research are to (a) describe self-esteem and well-being among women with breast cancer and age-matched comparison women without breast or other cancers and (b) examine the relationship between self-esteem and well-being. This research combines theories of Rosenberg (self-esteem), Reed (self-transcendence), Maslow (self-actualization), and Ryff (well-being). Participants include 64 women in each group age-matched to within four years. Measures include Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, the Self-Anchoring Self-Esteem Scale (quantitative and narrative data), Ryff's Measure of Self-Acceptance, and Ryff's Measures of Well-Being (subscales: environmental mastery, personal growth, positive relations with others, autonomy, and purpose in life). Data analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, and narrative data analysis techniques such as data reduction, thematic analysis, and contrast analysis. Differences and similarities between self-esteem and well-being among and between the two groups will be assessed. This research attempts to address limitations in conceptualizing and measuring self-esteem to promote understanding of self-esteem and its relationship to well-being. Strongly grounding the research within a developmental perspective allows for consideration of the possibility that cancer can trigger growth and development in some individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Esteem and Well-Being Among Women with Breast Cancer and Age-Matched Comparison Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166332-
dc.description.abstractWomen with breast cancer can experience significant, irreversible changes in the self that can affect their self-esteem and well-being. Although researchers typically focus on breast cancer's potential to negatively affect self-esteem, theory and research suggest that some women are able to experience positive changes in the self following diagnosis of cancer. Such positive changes in the self may improve self-esteem and subsequently improve well-being. The purposes of this research are to (a) describe self-esteem and well-being among women with breast cancer and age-matched comparison women without breast or other cancers and (b) examine the relationship between self-esteem and well-being. This research combines theories of Rosenberg (self-esteem), Reed (self-transcendence), Maslow (self-actualization), and Ryff (well-being). Participants include 64 women in each group age-matched to within four years. Measures include Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, the Self-Anchoring Self-Esteem Scale (quantitative and narrative data), Ryff's Measure of Self-Acceptance, and Ryff's Measures of Well-Being (subscales: environmental mastery, personal growth, positive relations with others, autonomy, and purpose in life). Data analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, and narrative data analysis techniques such as data reduction, thematic analysis, and contrast analysis. Differences and similarities between self-esteem and well-being among and between the two groups will be assessed. This research attempts to address limitations in conceptualizing and measuring self-esteem to promote understanding of self-esteem and its relationship to well-being. Strongly grounding the research within a developmental perspective allows for consideration of the possibility that cancer can trigger growth and development in some individuals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:02Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.