2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166340
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Distress in Nurses: The Darker Side of Care
Author(s):
Lyon, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Lyon, MS/MSc, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: delyon@ufl.edu
Abstract:
Background: Although spiritual distress has been explored in patients undergoing traumatic or life-altering experience, little attention has been given to the possible psychological and spiritual distress of nurses who are physically and emotionally present in circumstances in which many aspects of human existence-such as pain, death, suffering and despair-are experienced first-hand in clinical settings. Given the current emphasis on the philosophy of caring in the nursing literature, it is important to begin to examine the possible consequences to nurses of witnessing, being present for, and suffering with others on a regular basis. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of nurses to situations from their clinical practice in which they experienced spiritual distress and to investigate the methods by which they first recognized, then managed, the emotional and spiritual consequences of their client/nurse involvement. Design/Sample: This pilot study used a qualitative interpretive design in a sample of four nurse-caregivers from various clinical and administrative settings. The nurse informants participated in opened ended one-and-a-half to two hour interviews which were taped and transcribed. Data were analyzed across texts for descriptions of situations in which the informants described as being a precursor to a questioning of their spiritual belief system. The nurses shared the lived-experiences of questioning their belief system and described the processes and strategies which promoted their eventual recovery from their spiritual distress. Findings: Emergent themes included a) anger, b) spiritual change and reaffirmation of faith, c) physical connection/disconnection with patients, and d) role reversal-in which the patient became the comforter and the nurse became the "patient." Implications: Further study of spiritual/existential distress is warranted due to the intimate nature of nursing which focuses on treating "human responses" of others, at times to the possible detriment to the nurse-caregiver.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Distress in Nurses: The Darker Side of Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLyon, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Lyon, MS/MSc, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: delyon@ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166340-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although spiritual distress has been explored in patients undergoing traumatic or life-altering experience, little attention has been given to the possible psychological and spiritual distress of nurses who are physically and emotionally present in circumstances in which many aspects of human existence-such as pain, death, suffering and despair-are experienced first-hand in clinical settings. Given the current emphasis on the philosophy of caring in the nursing literature, it is important to begin to examine the possible consequences to nurses of witnessing, being present for, and suffering with others on a regular basis. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of nurses to situations from their clinical practice in which they experienced spiritual distress and to investigate the methods by which they first recognized, then managed, the emotional and spiritual consequences of their client/nurse involvement. Design/Sample: This pilot study used a qualitative interpretive design in a sample of four nurse-caregivers from various clinical and administrative settings. The nurse informants participated in opened ended one-and-a-half to two hour interviews which were taped and transcribed. Data were analyzed across texts for descriptions of situations in which the informants described as being a precursor to a questioning of their spiritual belief system. The nurses shared the lived-experiences of questioning their belief system and described the processes and strategies which promoted their eventual recovery from their spiritual distress. Findings: Emergent themes included a) anger, b) spiritual change and reaffirmation of faith, c) physical connection/disconnection with patients, and d) role reversal-in which the patient became the comforter and the nurse became the "patient." Implications: Further study of spiritual/existential distress is warranted due to the intimate nature of nursing which focuses on treating "human responses" of others, at times to the possible detriment to the nurse-caregiver.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:12Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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