A Retrospective View of Vaginal Candidiasis in a Cohort of Women with HIV-1 Infection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166344
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Retrospective View of Vaginal Candidiasis in a Cohort of Women with HIV-1 Infection
Author(s):
Cotton, Sandra
Author Details:
Sandra Cotton, MS/MSc, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, scotton@wvu.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the incidence of vaginal Candidiasis in a cohort of incarcerated women with HIV-1 infection and a cohort of HIV-1 seronegative incarcerated women. A secondary aim of this study was to evaluate if the presence of recurrent vaginal Candidiasis prompted clinicians to consider HIV infection in the patient's differential diagnosis. A sample size of forty subjects for each group was proposed. Due to unexpected shortened periods of incarceration for many potential subjects, only 25 of 204 HIV-1 positive inmates from the Maryland Division of Correction (DOC) met the study entry criteria of a minimum of twelve months incarceration. Twenty-five HIV-1 seronegative women served as the controls. Given the low incidence and small sample size, statistical significance could not be properly evaluated. Subsequently, the findings of this retrospective descriptive study represent trends. The subjects in the HIV-1 positive group were exclusively black and 88.0% had a history of IDU as their risk factor for HIV transmission. Mean sentence length was 21.1 mos, with only 40.0% released from the DOC. The subjects in the HIV-1 seronegative group were predominantly black (68.0%), 32.0% had a history of IDU and 40.0% were unknown as to their risk factor(s) for HIV transmission. Mean sentence length was 19 mos, with only 28.0% released from the DOC. The two groups ranged in age from 19 to 58 yrs old. Mean ages for the two groups were both 32 yrs old. The incidence of vaginal Candidiasis in the cohort of twenty-five incarcerated women with HIV-1 infection was three times higher than the cohort of twenty-five incarcerated women who tested HIV-1 negative. However, the results did not achieve statistical significance (z=1.04, p>0.05). Several empirically treated cases of vaginal Candidiasis were noted and the incidence of these cases was also found not to be significantly different in the HIV-1 positive subjects (z=1.50, p>0.05). HIV-1 infection was not considered in the differential diagnosis of the four incarcerated women with recurrent vaginal Candidiasis. Further research concerning vaginal Candidiasis in women with HIV-1 infection, using larger sample sizes, is needed in order to provide definitive information.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Retrospective View of Vaginal Candidiasis in a Cohort of Women with HIV-1 Infectionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCotton, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Cotton, MS/MSc, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, scotton@wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166344-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the incidence of vaginal Candidiasis in a cohort of incarcerated women with HIV-1 infection and a cohort of HIV-1 seronegative incarcerated women. A secondary aim of this study was to evaluate if the presence of recurrent vaginal Candidiasis prompted clinicians to consider HIV infection in the patient's differential diagnosis. A sample size of forty subjects for each group was proposed. Due to unexpected shortened periods of incarceration for many potential subjects, only 25 of 204 HIV-1 positive inmates from the Maryland Division of Correction (DOC) met the study entry criteria of a minimum of twelve months incarceration. Twenty-five HIV-1 seronegative women served as the controls. Given the low incidence and small sample size, statistical significance could not be properly evaluated. Subsequently, the findings of this retrospective descriptive study represent trends. The subjects in the HIV-1 positive group were exclusively black and 88.0% had a history of IDU as their risk factor for HIV transmission. Mean sentence length was 21.1 mos, with only 40.0% released from the DOC. The subjects in the HIV-1 seronegative group were predominantly black (68.0%), 32.0% had a history of IDU and 40.0% were unknown as to their risk factor(s) for HIV transmission. Mean sentence length was 19 mos, with only 28.0% released from the DOC. The two groups ranged in age from 19 to 58 yrs old. Mean ages for the two groups were both 32 yrs old. The incidence of vaginal Candidiasis in the cohort of twenty-five incarcerated women with HIV-1 infection was three times higher than the cohort of twenty-five incarcerated women who tested HIV-1 negative. However, the results did not achieve statistical significance (z=1.04, p>0.05). Several empirically treated cases of vaginal Candidiasis were noted and the incidence of these cases was also found not to be significantly different in the HIV-1 positive subjects (z=1.50, p>0.05). HIV-1 infection was not considered in the differential diagnosis of the four incarcerated women with recurrent vaginal Candidiasis. Further research concerning vaginal Candidiasis in women with HIV-1 infection, using larger sample sizes, is needed in order to provide definitive information.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:17Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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