2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166345
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Ethnographic Description of an Inner City School Community
Author(s):
Ark, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Ark, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Tennessee, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: park@tnstate.edu
Abstract:
The overall purpose of the study is to provide an ethnographic description of an inner city school community. The specific aim of this study is to provide information which could serve in designing programs based on the health needs and concerns as identified by the members of the school community. The community is located in one of the city's census tracts with dire poverty status. The school enrollment is approximately 650 children in kindergarten through sixth grade. There are no onsite school health services. There are generalizations and myths about the beliefs and behaviors of people who live in an inner city community. Faculty, staff, students, and families in the school community will be asked to participate in the study. Ethnographic interviews will provide emic data from the faculty, staff, students and families. The first phase as reported in this poster involves analysis of data provided by faculty as key informants. Other key and general informants from the staff, students, and families will be interviewed as the study progresses. Ethnographic participant observations include classroom activity, office activity, and neighborhood aspects of the school community. These observations will also be incorporated in the analysis. Leininger's Phases of Ethnographic/ Ethnonursing will be used to focus the analysis. One pattern emerging from initial faculty interviews includes the need to focus on concerns for the students' safety, nutrition, and hygiene. Preliminary observations support a pattern of nurturance of children in the school setting. Implications for the study include the opportunity to focus on the cultural aspects of school health as well as providing a foundation to support community health nursing school-based programs. Rather than generalizations and myths about the beliefs and behaviors of an inner city school, this study will provide pertinent and meaningful data.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Ethnographic Description of an Inner City School Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArk, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Ark, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Tennessee, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: park@tnstate.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166345-
dc.description.abstractThe overall purpose of the study is to provide an ethnographic description of an inner city school community. The specific aim of this study is to provide information which could serve in designing programs based on the health needs and concerns as identified by the members of the school community. The community is located in one of the city's census tracts with dire poverty status. The school enrollment is approximately 650 children in kindergarten through sixth grade. There are no onsite school health services. There are generalizations and myths about the beliefs and behaviors of people who live in an inner city community. Faculty, staff, students, and families in the school community will be asked to participate in the study. Ethnographic interviews will provide emic data from the faculty, staff, students and families. The first phase as reported in this poster involves analysis of data provided by faculty as key informants. Other key and general informants from the staff, students, and families will be interviewed as the study progresses. Ethnographic participant observations include classroom activity, office activity, and neighborhood aspects of the school community. These observations will also be incorporated in the analysis. Leininger's Phases of Ethnographic/ Ethnonursing will be used to focus the analysis. One pattern emerging from initial faculty interviews includes the need to focus on concerns for the students' safety, nutrition, and hygiene. Preliminary observations support a pattern of nurturance of children in the school setting. Implications for the study include the opportunity to focus on the cultural aspects of school health as well as providing a foundation to support community health nursing school-based programs. Rather than generalizations and myths about the beliefs and behaviors of an inner city school, this study will provide pertinent and meaningful data.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:19Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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