2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166348
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge of Men Treated for Localized Prostate Cancer
Author(s):
Bailey, Jr., Donald
Author Details:
Donald Bailey, Jr., MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: chip.bailey@duke.edu
Abstract:
Specific Aims: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of death among men from cancer in this country. Two hundred forty-four thousand new cases are predicted for 1995, a 22% increase from 1994 (American Cancer Society, 1995). In the United States, more than 40,000 men will die from prostate cancer this year. This poster will describe the knowledge men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer have about their disease. These preliminary data are from a larger intervention trial, Management of Uncertainty in Prostate Cancer. Research Questions: 1. What are the differences between African American and Caucasian men in their knowledge about prostate cancer? 2. What knowledge do men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer have about their disease? Subjects: Subjects were 100 men (29 African American) treated with radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy for either Stage B1, B2, or C1 prostate cancer. Subjects ranged in age from 45-76 (mean=63) and were recruited from four tertiary care hospitals serving rural and urban regions in a Southeastern state. Methods: The design for the larger intervention study is a 3X2 randomized block, repeated measures design. A knowledge scale consisting of 20 items related to prostate cancer, its treatment and side effects was collected at baseline in the patient's home by a nurse. Frequency distributions of knowledge items for Caucasian and African American men were calculated. Statistical comparisons by race were undertaken using Chi Square test. Findings: Differences between African American and Caucasian men were found on seven knowledge items; four dealing with prevalence of prostate cancer and three items dealing with treatment side effects. As a total, 85% of the subjects correctly identified prostate cancer as the most frequently occurring cancer in men. Ninety-five percent of the men identified increased age as a risk factor. The question answered incorrectly most often concerned the location of the majority of malignant prostate tumors (22%), with 52% of the men responding "do not know". In addition, 30% of the subjects responded "do not know" to questions dealing with treatment specific side effects. Implications: There were significant differences between African American and Caucasian men on seven knowledge items (X2, p<0.05). African American men more frequently responded "do not know" as compared to Caucasian men who responded "false" to these knowledge items. Subjects in this study identify prostate cancer as the most common cancer in men and also identify age as a risk factor. Subjects need additional knowledge about treatment specific side effects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge of Men Treated for Localized Prostate Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jr., Donalden_US
dc.author.detailsDonald Bailey, Jr., MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: chip.bailey@duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166348-
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of death among men from cancer in this country. Two hundred forty-four thousand new cases are predicted for 1995, a 22% increase from 1994 (American Cancer Society, 1995). In the United States, more than 40,000 men will die from prostate cancer this year. This poster will describe the knowledge men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer have about their disease. These preliminary data are from a larger intervention trial, Management of Uncertainty in Prostate Cancer. Research Questions: 1. What are the differences between African American and Caucasian men in their knowledge about prostate cancer? 2. What knowledge do men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer have about their disease? Subjects: Subjects were 100 men (29 African American) treated with radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy for either Stage B1, B2, or C1 prostate cancer. Subjects ranged in age from 45-76 (mean=63) and were recruited from four tertiary care hospitals serving rural and urban regions in a Southeastern state. Methods: The design for the larger intervention study is a 3X2 randomized block, repeated measures design. A knowledge scale consisting of 20 items related to prostate cancer, its treatment and side effects was collected at baseline in the patient's home by a nurse. Frequency distributions of knowledge items for Caucasian and African American men were calculated. Statistical comparisons by race were undertaken using Chi Square test. Findings: Differences between African American and Caucasian men were found on seven knowledge items; four dealing with prevalence of prostate cancer and three items dealing with treatment side effects. As a total, 85% of the subjects correctly identified prostate cancer as the most frequently occurring cancer in men. Ninety-five percent of the men identified increased age as a risk factor. The question answered incorrectly most often concerned the location of the majority of malignant prostate tumors (22%), with 52% of the men responding "do not know". In addition, 30% of the subjects responded "do not know" to questions dealing with treatment specific side effects. Implications: There were significant differences between African American and Caucasian men on seven knowledge items (X2, p<0.05). African American men more frequently responded "do not know" as compared to Caucasian men who responded "false" to these knowledge items. Subjects in this study identify prostate cancer as the most common cancer in men and also identify age as a risk factor. Subjects need additional knowledge about treatment specific side effects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:23Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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