2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166358
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African-American Women's Explantory Models of Weight
Author(s):
Allan, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Allan, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: allanj@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Of central concern to practice and research in women's health is the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among women. A 1991 national survey (NHANES-III) reported that 48.6% of African-American women were overweight. This paper uses data from multiple intensive interviews with 20 middle class and 20 working class African-American women to describe participants' explanatory models of weight and the relationship between these models of weight and weight management activities. The conceptual orientation for this cultural-ecological study is based upon two concepts: 1) explanatory model (EM); and 2) coping. Explanatory models (Kleinman, 1980), as aspects of health beliefs, represent how an individual classifies and interprets his/her own health experience. This concept enabled exploration of women's culturally based explanations for causes and treatment of weight. Coping (Bennett, 1976) is defined as a process through which the individual manages the demands of an environment that is appraised as stressful. This concept was used to explore women's weight management activities in a society which constitutes a stressful environment in which to manage weight. A naturalistic study design using intensive interviews and anthropometric measures was used. Snowball sampling was used to obtain a sample of 40 women of varying age, marital status and weight. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using techniques of content and theme analysis. Results indicate that all participants have EMS of why they are normal or overweight. The most frequent EM categories of the causes of overweight were nutritional (overeating and eating the wrong foods); physiological (pregnancy, lack of exercise, and genetics); and psychological (lack of discipline and oral needs). More middle class women believed that sedentariness and the "Black Diet" caused weight gain than working class women. The linkages between EMs and weight management activities were fairly consistent with the majority of women using exercise and/or reducing high calorie foods to lose-weight. In contrast to Euro-American women and despite statements about complex stressful lives and jobs, African-American women did not identify stress or role overload as causes of overweight. Findings have implications for nursing actions related to health promotion with respect to weight.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican-American Women's Explantory Models of Weighten_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Allan, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: allanj@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166358-
dc.description.abstractOf central concern to practice and research in women's health is the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among women. A 1991 national survey (NHANES-III) reported that 48.6% of African-American women were overweight. This paper uses data from multiple intensive interviews with 20 middle class and 20 working class African-American women to describe participants' explanatory models of weight and the relationship between these models of weight and weight management activities. The conceptual orientation for this cultural-ecological study is based upon two concepts: 1) explanatory model (EM); and 2) coping. Explanatory models (Kleinman, 1980), as aspects of health beliefs, represent how an individual classifies and interprets his/her own health experience. This concept enabled exploration of women's culturally based explanations for causes and treatment of weight. Coping (Bennett, 1976) is defined as a process through which the individual manages the demands of an environment that is appraised as stressful. This concept was used to explore women's weight management activities in a society which constitutes a stressful environment in which to manage weight. A naturalistic study design using intensive interviews and anthropometric measures was used. Snowball sampling was used to obtain a sample of 40 women of varying age, marital status and weight. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using techniques of content and theme analysis. Results indicate that all participants have EMS of why they are normal or overweight. The most frequent EM categories of the causes of overweight were nutritional (overeating and eating the wrong foods); physiological (pregnancy, lack of exercise, and genetics); and psychological (lack of discipline and oral needs). More middle class women believed that sedentariness and the "Black Diet" caused weight gain than working class women. The linkages between EMs and weight management activities were fairly consistent with the majority of women using exercise and/or reducing high calorie foods to lose-weight. In contrast to Euro-American women and despite statements about complex stressful lives and jobs, African-American women did not identify stress or role overload as causes of overweight. Findings have implications for nursing actions related to health promotion with respect to weight.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:35Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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