Transaction and Self-Care Agency as Predictors of Self-Care Practice AmongHealthy and Chronically Ill Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166362
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transaction and Self-Care Agency as Predictors of Self-Care Practice AmongHealthy and Chronically Ill Adolescents
Author(s):
Binder, Brenda
Author Details:
Brenda Binder, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Woman's University, Denton, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bkbinder@hbu.edu
Abstract:
Healthy People: The Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention established a broad set of national goals for improving the health habits of Americans. In this report, 50% of the deaths in the United States each year were attributed to unhealthy behaviors or lifestyles. Both society and adolescents expect that they are capable of, and should be assuming, increasing responsibility for their own health. Impressive gains in adolescent health, as well as a reduction in adult morbidity and mortality could be achieved through a greater understanding of effective ways to change adolescents' behavior to promotion of health and prevention of disease. Positive health behaviors developed during adolescent years are resistant to change and persist over time. This study is designed to investigate the relationship between adolescents' perceptions of their interactions with their health care providers; their ability to act on their own behalf; and their health care practices. A school and a health care institution will be used as data collection sites for this study. A convenience sample of 30 adolescents between the ages of 12 to 15, will be selected. Selection will occur from two groups of adolescents, those with health problems and those without health problems, until the sample consists of 15 healthy and 15 chronically ill adolescents. Data collection will consists of a demographic data form, the Adolescent Transaction Interview Guide, Denyes' Self-Care Agency Instrument and Denyes' Self-Care Practice Instrument. Data analysis will include descriptive statistical methods, t-tests, Chi-Sguares, Pearson Product Moment correlations, ANCOVA and stepwise multiple regression. Nurses should be able to identify and strengthen skills which enhance adolescents' ability to be active health care participants. Information generated from this study will provide the basis for the development of an intervention to encourage an active consumer role and positive self-care practice among adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransaction and Self-Care Agency as Predictors of Self-Care Practice AmongHealthy and Chronically Ill Adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBinder, Brendaen_US
dc.author.detailsBrenda Binder, PhD, Associate Professor, Texas Woman's University, Denton, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bkbinder@hbu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166362-
dc.description.abstractHealthy People: The Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention established a broad set of national goals for improving the health habits of Americans. In this report, 50% of the deaths in the United States each year were attributed to unhealthy behaviors or lifestyles. Both society and adolescents expect that they are capable of, and should be assuming, increasing responsibility for their own health. Impressive gains in adolescent health, as well as a reduction in adult morbidity and mortality could be achieved through a greater understanding of effective ways to change adolescents' behavior to promotion of health and prevention of disease. Positive health behaviors developed during adolescent years are resistant to change and persist over time. This study is designed to investigate the relationship between adolescents' perceptions of their interactions with their health care providers; their ability to act on their own behalf; and their health care practices. A school and a health care institution will be used as data collection sites for this study. A convenience sample of 30 adolescents between the ages of 12 to 15, will be selected. Selection will occur from two groups of adolescents, those with health problems and those without health problems, until the sample consists of 15 healthy and 15 chronically ill adolescents. Data collection will consists of a demographic data form, the Adolescent Transaction Interview Guide, Denyes' Self-Care Agency Instrument and Denyes' Self-Care Practice Instrument. Data analysis will include descriptive statistical methods, t-tests, Chi-Sguares, Pearson Product Moment correlations, ANCOVA and stepwise multiple regression. Nurses should be able to identify and strengthen skills which enhance adolescents' ability to be active health care participants. Information generated from this study will provide the basis for the development of an intervention to encourage an active consumer role and positive self-care practice among adolescents.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:40Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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