2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166364
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life in Individuals with AIDS
Author(s):
Bowman, Josie
Author Details:
Josie Bowman, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, School of Nursing East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: bowmanj@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Due to the high incidence of people with AIDS (PWA) or a diagnosis of HIV positive, nurses will have increased contact with these individuals. The focus of nursing is provision of comfort and assisting the individual in maintaining quality of life (QOL) for the duration of the disease. This descriptive correlational study was conducted to collect data regarding QOL and symptom distress of PWAs. The following research questions were addressed: 1) What is the QOL of individuals with a diagnosis of HIV positive or AIDS? 2) Is there a relationship between QOL and the diagnosis of HIV positive or AIDS? 3) What is the level of symptom distress in PWAs? 4) Is there a relationship between QOL and symptom distress in PWAs? A convenience sample of 98 individuals who were HIV positive or have a diagnosis of AIDS were interviewed, using a demographic data instrument, McCorkle-Young Smptom Distress Scale (McCorkle & Young, 1978), and a Multidimensional QOL Scale (Shea, 1990). Data was collected in an outpatient setting in rural eastern North Carolina. Demographic data was analyzed using means, standard deviations, and frequencies. Correlation statistics were used to analyze the relationship between QOL and other select variables. A p<.05 of significance was employed. The findings revealed that overall QOL was 60.49 on a 100 point scale with 100 indicating the best QOL. The overall symptom distress score was 39.9 with a higher number indicating more symptom distress. There was a significant relationship between QOL and symptom distress. There was a significant relationship between QOL and symptom distress, (correlation=-.69, p<.0001) indicating the less symptoms experienced the better the QOL. These findings have significance for nursing in planning care for these individuals. As assessment of the perceived QOL should be completed on each patient/client therefore ensuring baseline data and areas of focus for care. The use of the symptom distress scale will enable the nurse and other health care providers to monitor and prevent symptoms on an ongoing basis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life in Individuals with AIDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBowman, Josieen_US
dc.author.detailsJosie Bowman, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, School of Nursing East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: bowmanj@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166364-
dc.description.abstractDue to the high incidence of people with AIDS (PWA) or a diagnosis of HIV positive, nurses will have increased contact with these individuals. The focus of nursing is provision of comfort and assisting the individual in maintaining quality of life (QOL) for the duration of the disease. This descriptive correlational study was conducted to collect data regarding QOL and symptom distress of PWAs. The following research questions were addressed: 1) What is the QOL of individuals with a diagnosis of HIV positive or AIDS? 2) Is there a relationship between QOL and the diagnosis of HIV positive or AIDS? 3) What is the level of symptom distress in PWAs? 4) Is there a relationship between QOL and symptom distress in PWAs? A convenience sample of 98 individuals who were HIV positive or have a diagnosis of AIDS were interviewed, using a demographic data instrument, McCorkle-Young Smptom Distress Scale (McCorkle & Young, 1978), and a Multidimensional QOL Scale (Shea, 1990). Data was collected in an outpatient setting in rural eastern North Carolina. Demographic data was analyzed using means, standard deviations, and frequencies. Correlation statistics were used to analyze the relationship between QOL and other select variables. A p<.05 of significance was employed. The findings revealed that overall QOL was 60.49 on a 100 point scale with 100 indicating the best QOL. The overall symptom distress score was 39.9 with a higher number indicating more symptom distress. There was a significant relationship between QOL and symptom distress. There was a significant relationship between QOL and symptom distress, (correlation=-.69, p<.0001) indicating the less symptoms experienced the better the QOL. These findings have significance for nursing in planning care for these individuals. As assessment of the perceived QOL should be completed on each patient/client therefore ensuring baseline data and areas of focus for care. The use of the symptom distress scale will enable the nurse and other health care providers to monitor and prevent symptoms on an ongoing basis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:43Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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