2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166365
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Pain
Author(s):
Brown, Sylvia
Author Details:
Sylvia Brown, EdD, Associate Professor, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: brownsy@ecu.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine knowledge and attitudes regarding pain assessment and management of practicing nurses in a Southeastern state. The following research questions were addressed: (1) What are practicing nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management? (2) What differences exist between nurses' educational preparation and their level of knowledge about pain assessment and narcotic administration? (3) What is the level of nursing knowledge regarding the frequency of addiction in patients treated for pain? (4) What is the relationship between nurses' practice setting and their level of knowledge about pain management? and (5) What is the relationship between nurses' clinical specialty area and their level of knowledge about pain management? A descriptive research design was used for the study. A stratified random sample of 1000 practicing nurses in a selected state were surveyed. A cover letter was sent to the subjects explaining the study, assuring their anonymity, and that completion of the survey would imply their consent. The research instrument used after obtaining permission from the authors was "The Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain" developed by McCaffery and Ferrell. In addition, a demographic data questionnaire was included. No identifying information was included on this instrument. A reminder postcard was mailed two weeks after the original mailing. There were 260 completed questionnaires returned, representing a 26% return rate for the mail survey. The mean score on the Knowledge and Attitudes survey was 64.58 with a range of 31.43-97.14. Ten of the thirty-five items were answered incorrectly by more than 50% of the sample. No statistically significant difference was found between nurses' educational preparation and their level of knowledge about pain assessment and narcotic administration. Only 30.7% of the sample knew that opioid addiction occurred in less than one percent of individuals as a result of treating pain with opioid analgesics. No significant correlation was found between nurses' practice setting or their clinical specialty area and their level of knowledge about pain management. Nurses spend more time with patients in pain than any other member of the health care team. The findings from this study indicate that practicing nurses need more education on pain management. The low overall mean and individual item analysis indicate that nurses do not adequately understand the effective use of narcotics in relation to pain management. It is imperative that nursing curricula in educational institutions and programs of continuing education in practice settings provide instruction to improve nurses' pain management skills and knowledge.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sylviaen_US
dc.author.detailsSylvia Brown, EdD, Associate Professor, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: brownsy@ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166365-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine knowledge and attitudes regarding pain assessment and management of practicing nurses in a Southeastern state. The following research questions were addressed: (1) What are practicing nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management? (2) What differences exist between nurses' educational preparation and their level of knowledge about pain assessment and narcotic administration? (3) What is the level of nursing knowledge regarding the frequency of addiction in patients treated for pain? (4) What is the relationship between nurses' practice setting and their level of knowledge about pain management? and (5) What is the relationship between nurses' clinical specialty area and their level of knowledge about pain management? A descriptive research design was used for the study. A stratified random sample of 1000 practicing nurses in a selected state were surveyed. A cover letter was sent to the subjects explaining the study, assuring their anonymity, and that completion of the survey would imply their consent. The research instrument used after obtaining permission from the authors was "The Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain" developed by McCaffery and Ferrell. In addition, a demographic data questionnaire was included. No identifying information was included on this instrument. A reminder postcard was mailed two weeks after the original mailing. There were 260 completed questionnaires returned, representing a 26% return rate for the mail survey. The mean score on the Knowledge and Attitudes survey was 64.58 with a range of 31.43-97.14. Ten of the thirty-five items were answered incorrectly by more than 50% of the sample. No statistically significant difference was found between nurses' educational preparation and their level of knowledge about pain assessment and narcotic administration. Only 30.7% of the sample knew that opioid addiction occurred in less than one percent of individuals as a result of treating pain with opioid analgesics. No significant correlation was found between nurses' practice setting or their clinical specialty area and their level of knowledge about pain management. Nurses spend more time with patients in pain than any other member of the health care team. The findings from this study indicate that practicing nurses need more education on pain management. The low overall mean and individual item analysis indicate that nurses do not adequately understand the effective use of narcotics in relation to pain management. It is imperative that nursing curricula in educational institutions and programs of continuing education in practice settings provide instruction to improve nurses' pain management skills and knowledge.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:44Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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