2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166368
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Support Processes in African American Pregnant Women
Author(s):
Coffman, Sherrilyn
Author Details:
Sherrilyn Coffman, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Nurse Practitioner, Sierra Health Services Ambulatory Care Management, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, email: scoffman@sierrahealth.com
Abstract:
Women of low income and minority status who are experiencing pregnancy complications are at high risk for poor neonatal outcomes. There is growing awareness that the course of high risk pregnancy can be critically determined by social factors. While outcomes of social support have been documented by research, the processes by which women and their families experience support are relatively unexplored. This study utilized the grounded theory method to study social support in a group of high risk, low income African American women during pregnancy and early parenthood. A qualitative research method was selected to provide information about the dynamic, changing processes involved in giving and receiving support. The study had to objectives: (a) to explore processes of social support among women experiencing high risk pregnancy, and (b) to generate substantive theory (theory generated from research) for purposes of developing a deeper understanding of the process of support. Ten African American women and their support providers, including three close persons and fourteen health professionals were interviewed and observed to provide descriptions of support processes. Through constant comparative analysis, a substantive theory generated from the study data was developed. The substantive theory of support was labeled "mutual intentionality." This term described the active role that both pregnant women and support givers played in the helping process. The phrase "being there" summarized the women's definition of support, implying that the support giver was available and willing to provide help when needed, and especially in times of trouble. Support was further described as caring, respecting, sharing information, knowing, believing in, and doing for the other. The study illuminates the dynamics of interpersonal relationships which are the core of transcultural nursing practice. For support to happen, mutuality must be established within the relationship and both support giver and recipient aim to meet the recipient's identified needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupport Processes in African American Pregnant Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoffman, Sherrilynen_US
dc.author.detailsSherrilyn Coffman, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Nurse Practitioner, Sierra Health Services Ambulatory Care Management, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, email: scoffman@sierrahealth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166368-
dc.description.abstractWomen of low income and minority status who are experiencing pregnancy complications are at high risk for poor neonatal outcomes. There is growing awareness that the course of high risk pregnancy can be critically determined by social factors. While outcomes of social support have been documented by research, the processes by which women and their families experience support are relatively unexplored. This study utilized the grounded theory method to study social support in a group of high risk, low income African American women during pregnancy and early parenthood. A qualitative research method was selected to provide information about the dynamic, changing processes involved in giving and receiving support. The study had to objectives: (a) to explore processes of social support among women experiencing high risk pregnancy, and (b) to generate substantive theory (theory generated from research) for purposes of developing a deeper understanding of the process of support. Ten African American women and their support providers, including three close persons and fourteen health professionals were interviewed and observed to provide descriptions of support processes. Through constant comparative analysis, a substantive theory generated from the study data was developed. The substantive theory of support was labeled "mutual intentionality." This term described the active role that both pregnant women and support givers played in the helping process. The phrase "being there" summarized the women's definition of support, implying that the support giver was available and willing to provide help when needed, and especially in times of trouble. Support was further described as caring, respecting, sharing information, knowing, believing in, and doing for the other. The study illuminates the dynamics of interpersonal relationships which are the core of transcultural nursing practice. For support to happen, mutuality must be established within the relationship and both support giver and recipient aim to meet the recipient's identified needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:47Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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