2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166369
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Among Iron and Zinc Indices and Infant Birthweight
Author(s):
Corbett, Robin
Author Details:
Robin Corbett, PhD, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greensville, North Carolina, USA, email: corbettr@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Infant mortality is a significant health care problem in the United States, especially in the southeastern region. African-American women, specifically rural socioeconomically disadvantaged women. This study examined the relationships of iron and zinc indices; dietary, plasma, vitamin supplementation, pica and infant birthweight among socioeconomically disadvantaged pregnant women in context of the Roy Adaptation Model. Research hypotheses included 1) there is a positive correlation between iron and infant birthweight, 2) there is a positive correlation zinc and infant birthweight, and 3) demographic characteristics, health characteristics, iron and zinc in dietary food stuffs, pica substances and plasma are predictors of infant birthweight. The sample was composed of 128 socioeconomically disadvantaged women receiving prenatal care from two rural community health agencies. This study was a comparative correlational investigation. Demographic and sociocultural data were collected. The dietary level of iron and zinc were ascertained by analysis of a brief food frequency recall. Nutritional analysis of iron and zinc was determined for each food substance and totaled for a total dietary iron and zinc level. Vitamin iron and zinc supplementation totals were obtained specific to the participant's reported practice of taking the supplements. One plasma sample was obtained from each participant scheduled for routine prenatal blood work. Pica substances; ice, laundry starch, cornstarch and clay were collected via home visit from women verbalizing the practice of pica during this pregnancy. The plasma samples and the pica substances were analyzed to determine extractable iron and zinc. This analysis of extractable trace elements in the pica substance and the total trace element concentration in the plasma samples yielded specific levels for individual parturients. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, Pearson product-moment correlation, ANOVAs and stepwise multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Statistical analysis controlled for ethnicity. The majority of the sample were single, African-American women, two demographic characteristics significantly related to lower infant birthweight. Predictors of increased infant birthweight were increased dietary/vitamin iron levels and decreased plasma iron and plasma zinc levels. Decreased plasma zinc levels was associated with pica practice. This research supports the multifaceted nature of infant mortality. Implications for future research include investigation of the specific effects of iron and zinc on fetal development at varying gestational stages, and the relationship of dietary iron and zinc, vitamin iron and zinc supplementation and plasma iron and zinc to infant birthweight, particularly in high risk populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Among Iron and Zinc Indices and Infant Birthweighten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorbett, Robinen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Corbett, PhD, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greensville, North Carolina, USA, email: corbettr@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166369-
dc.description.abstractInfant mortality is a significant health care problem in the United States, especially in the southeastern region. African-American women, specifically rural socioeconomically disadvantaged women. This study examined the relationships of iron and zinc indices; dietary, plasma, vitamin supplementation, pica and infant birthweight among socioeconomically disadvantaged pregnant women in context of the Roy Adaptation Model. Research hypotheses included 1) there is a positive correlation between iron and infant birthweight, 2) there is a positive correlation zinc and infant birthweight, and 3) demographic characteristics, health characteristics, iron and zinc in dietary food stuffs, pica substances and plasma are predictors of infant birthweight. The sample was composed of 128 socioeconomically disadvantaged women receiving prenatal care from two rural community health agencies. This study was a comparative correlational investigation. Demographic and sociocultural data were collected. The dietary level of iron and zinc were ascertained by analysis of a brief food frequency recall. Nutritional analysis of iron and zinc was determined for each food substance and totaled for a total dietary iron and zinc level. Vitamin iron and zinc supplementation totals were obtained specific to the participant's reported practice of taking the supplements. One plasma sample was obtained from each participant scheduled for routine prenatal blood work. Pica substances; ice, laundry starch, cornstarch and clay were collected via home visit from women verbalizing the practice of pica during this pregnancy. The plasma samples and the pica substances were analyzed to determine extractable iron and zinc. This analysis of extractable trace elements in the pica substance and the total trace element concentration in the plasma samples yielded specific levels for individual parturients. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, Pearson product-moment correlation, ANOVAs and stepwise multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Statistical analysis controlled for ethnicity. The majority of the sample were single, African-American women, two demographic characteristics significantly related to lower infant birthweight. Predictors of increased infant birthweight were increased dietary/vitamin iron levels and decreased plasma iron and plasma zinc levels. Decreased plasma zinc levels was associated with pica practice. This research supports the multifaceted nature of infant mortality. Implications for future research include investigation of the specific effects of iron and zinc on fetal development at varying gestational stages, and the relationship of dietary iron and zinc, vitamin iron and zinc supplementation and plasma iron and zinc to infant birthweight, particularly in high risk populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:48Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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